Advisory Board and Editors Bioengineering

PeerJ Factsheet
A one-page facts and stats PDF, to help when considering journal options with your co-authors.

Barbara J MacGregor

Research Asst. Professor, Marine Sciences, Univ. of North Carolina - Chapel Hill (2003-2017); Postdoctoral fellow, MPI – Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany (2000-2003); Research assistant and postdoctoral associate, Civil Engineering Dept., Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill. (1994-1999); PhD, Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin - Madison (1994); BS (1984) and MS (1986), Biology and Marine Microbiology, University of Massachusetts - Boston.

Research projects include: new methods to directly link species identity with carbon source utilization; direct profiling of microbial communities without PCR; direct detection of microbial enzymes in environmental samples.

Denis J. Marcellin-Little

Dr. Marcellin-Little is a veterinary orthopedic surgeon who has been doing research for approximately 20 years in the field of joint replacement, limb deformities, physical rehabilitation, and biomodeling/biomanufacturing. He has a particular interest in the interface between computers and orthopedics. He is a member of the Center of Additive Manufacturing and Logistics at North Carolina State University and an adjunct in the Departments of Biomedical Engineering (at NCSU), Industrial and Systems Engineering (at NCSU), and Physical Therapy (at UT-Chattanooga).

Radu Marculescu

Radu Marculescu is a Professor in the Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, USA. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Southern California in 1998.

Radu's current research focuses on developing methods and tools for modeling and optimization of embedded systems, cyber-physical systems, social networks, and biological systems. Radu Marculescu is a Fellow of IEEE cited for his contributions to the design and optimization of on-chip communication for embedded multicore systems.

Thimios A Mitsiadis

Professor of Oral Biology in the Medical Faculty at the University of Zurich, Switzerland since 2006. Research in the fields of stem cells, genetics, molecular and experimental biology related to orofacial developmental and regeneration processes.

DDS degree from the Dental Faculty of the Kapodistrion University of Athens (Greece), Master degree for Immunology, Genetics and Differentiation, and PhD in Developmental Biology from the University of Lyon (France). Postdoctoral studies at the University of Helsinki (Finland), Karolinksa Nobel Institute (Stockholm, Sweden) and Yale University (USA). Previously Professor at the Mediterranean University (Marseilles, France), Visiting Professor at the Ecole Normale Superieure of Lyon (France), Clinical Senior Lecturer at King's College London (UK), Visiting Professor at the Polytechnic University of Marche (Ancona, Italy), Visiting Professor at the Second University of Napoli (Napoli, Italy). Chief-Editor of the “Frontiers of Craniofacial Biology and Dental Research”, Associate Editor of “Stem Cell Research”, Scientific Editor of “European Cells & Materials”, and part of the editorial board in additional 8 scientific journals. More than 110 original articles in journals such as “Journal of Cell Biology”, “Development”, “Developmental Biology”, “Nature Genetics”, “Science Signaling”, “Scientific Reports”, “Frontiers in Physiology” and more than 200 keynote and invited lectures.

Corey Nislow

Corey Nislow's laboratory develops and uses cutting edge tools to address this central question: how can we understand the biological commonalities in all of the life sciences; from embryonic development, to the spread of infectious diseases to better ways to treat cancer. Each of these disciplines can be explained in the context of competition, interaction and evolution. His lab studies the interface between genes and the environment using parallel genome-wide screens, high throughput cell-based assays and next generation sequencing. Most recently, he and his scientific partner, Dr. Guri Giaever, are exploring how laboratory experiments can co-opt evolutionary processes to understand drug action. He enjoys teaching all aspects of biotechnology, genomics and drug discovery. He got his PhD from the University of Colorado, worked at several Biotechnology companies and was at Stanford and University of Toronto before joining UBC in 2013. He has published 161 papers and run 19 marathons.

David B Norman

Odell Fellow in the Natural Sciences at Christ's College Cambridge, University Reader in the Natural Sciences and Curator of Fossil Vertebrates at the Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences. Chairman of the Charles Darwin & Galapagos Islands Trust Fund. Associate Editor (and former Editor) of the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society of London. Council Member of the Cambridge Philosophical Society.

Sean P. Palecek

Professor of Chemical & Biological Engineering at the University of Wisconsin - Madison.

Colin Palmer

An engineer by training with a wide interest in low speed aerodynamics and the fluid dynamics of animal locomotion. PhD topic was the flight of the large pterosaurs. Research Associate at the universities of Bristol and Southampton in the UK.

Tarl W Prow

Dr. Tarl Prow is the Deputy Director of the Dermatology Research Centre within the School of Medicine and heads a group of 10 researchers focused on micromedical devices for dermatology and nanomedicine. He is a multidisciplinary researcher with internationally recognized expertise in the fields of micro-medical device development, nanodermatology, topical drug delivery and non-invasive imaging.

Thomas Ritter

Prof Thomas Ritter, leader of research programme, was recruited by the National University of Ireland, Galway as a lecturer in Gene Therapy and Regenerative Medicine and assumed his position in March 2005. Prof. Ritter has over 20 year experience in the field of gene therapy in organ transplantation. He obtained his Ph.D. degree in 1994 from the Max-Planck Research group of Immunology / Rheumatology at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany where he worked on the molecular characterization of T cell receptors specific for human collagen type II. Having completed his Post-Doctoral Fellowship at Marseille, Center of Immunology in 1995, Prof. Ritter took up a faculty position at the prestigious Charité University Hospital in Berlin, Germany. He worked as a leader of the gene therapy programme in experimental transplantation in the Institute of Medical Immunology under the directorship of Prof. Dr. H.-D. Volk. His research focused on the development of efficient viral gene-transfer systems for application in transplantation medicine. Prof. Ritter was successful in obtaining funding from the German Research Foundation and the Ministry of Health and Research as well as from industry (Schering). Prof. Ritter completed his 'Habilitation' (postdoctoral lecture qualification) in Immunology in 2002 followed by a promotion to assistant professor in 2003.

Ulrika Rova

Besides current research activities in pre-treatment and biochemical conversion of lignocellulose Rova has a background in recombinant protein expression, protein crystallization, biochemical characterization of catalytical properties of enzymes.

Boris Rubinsky

Professor at UC Berkeley since 1980. Resides in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Research in biomedical engineering.

Dr. Rubinsky's research interests include:
Heat and mass transfer in biomedical engineering and biotechnology in particular low temperature biology, bio-electronics and biomedical devices in particular micro and nano bionic technologies and electroporation, medical imaging in particular electrical impedance tomography and light imaging, biomedical numerical analysis in particular genetic and evolutionary algorithms and fractal techniques.