Advisory Board and Editors Evolutionary Studies

Virginia Abdala

Professor of General Biology, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, Argentina. Researcher at the CONICET, Tucuman, Argentina. Member of the Instituto de Biodiversidad Neotropical, UNT-CONICET, Argentina.

William Amos

Professor of Evolutionary Genetics in the Department of Zoology, Cambridge University. Head of the Molecular Ecology Research Group. Former associate editor of Molecular Ecology.

Maria Anisimova

Since 2014, senior research fellow and lecturer at the Institute of Applied Simulations of the Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW). Editor of BMC Evol Biol and PLoS ONE. In 2012 edited a book in 2 volumes "Evolutionary Genomics: Statistical and computational methods".

Jérémy Anquetin

Researcher at the 'Section d'archéologie et paléontologie', Jura cantonal Cultural Office, Switzerland. Jérémy received his PhD in Vertebrate Palaeontology from the University College London (UCL) and the Natural History Museum (NHM), London, UK. He specializes in the study of taxonomy, anatomy, and phylogeny of Mesozoic turtles. His current work is mainly focussed on Late Jurassic turtles from Europe.

Adam Auton

Assistant Professor of Computation Genetics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, NY.

Joe Bailey

Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Tennessee. My lab focuses on: 1) the factors that influence patterns of biodiversity with a specific focus on plant genetic variation, genotypic diveristy, and phylogenetic diversity. 2) The impacts of plant genetic variation and genotypic diversity on associated biodiversity and ecosystem function. Recipient of the Australian Research Council Future Fellow and Rising Star Leadership Fellow.

Wolfgang Banzhaf

Wolfgang Banzhaf is a professor in the Department of Computer Science of Memorial U. of Newfoundland. He received a "Diplom in Physik" degree in Physics from the LMU Munich and his Dr.rer.nat (PhD) from the Dept. of Physics of the TH Karlsruhe, now KIT. After a postdoc at the U. of Stuttgart, he was a Visiting and Senior Researcher at the Central Research Lab of Mitsubishi Electric in Japan and at MERL in Cambridge, USA. From 1993 to 2003 he was Assoc. Prof. for Appl. CS at TU Dortmund.

Louise Barrett

Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Cognition, Evolution and Behaviour; Member of Directorate, Institute of Child and Youth Studies, University of Lethbridge; Executive Editor, Animal Behaviour 2006-2011; Editor, Advances in the Study of Animal Behaviour; Past Member of Council, Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

Ugo Bastolla

I got my PhD in Physics at Rome University, working with Luca Peliti and Giorgio Parisi on biologically inspired problems: evolutionary models and Boolean networks. Since then, I have always been interested in computational biology: Protein folding, Stability and population biology constraints in protein evolution, Conformation changes in proteins, Structural evolution of proteins, Theoretical ecology, Ecological interactions among microorganisms.

Richard M. Bateman

Visiting Professor, University of Reading/Royal Botanic Gardens Kew. Formerly Head, Dept. of Botany, Natural History Museum; Director of Science, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh; Head of Policy, Biosciences Federation. President, UK Hardy Orchid Society; Previously President, Systematics Association, Vice-President, European Society for Evolutionary-Developmental Genetics, Linnean Society of London, Botanical Society of the British Isles. Co-founder/editorial board member of six journals.

Cristina Becchio

Cristina is Associate Professor at the Psychology Department, University of Turin, and Senior Researcher at the Robotics, Brain and Cognitive Sciences Department, Italian Institute of Technology, Genova. After studying philosophy at the University of Turin, in 2001 she joined a PhD Program in Cognitive Science. She became researcher at the University of Turin in 2006. She is interested in the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying motor cognition.

Susan M Bertram

My research addresses how genetic and environmental variation is maintained in sexually selected traits. My students and I use an animal behavior approach that incorporates tools from nutritional ecology, ecological physiology, and quantitative genetics. Our laboratory-based empirical research quantifies the phenotypic and genetically based variation in condition, life-history traits, and sexually selected traits and determines how this variation is influenced by diet and physiology.