Advisory Board and Editors Scientific Computing & Simulation

PeerJ Factsheet
A one-page facts and stats PDF, to help when considering journal options with your co-authors.

Ilkay Altintas

Ilkay Altintas is a research scientist at SDSC, UCSD since 2001. She has worked on different aspects of data science and scientific computing in leadership roles across a wide range of cross-disciplinary projects. She is a co-initiator of and an active contributor to the open-source Kepler Workflow System, and co-author of publications at the intersection of scientific workflows, provenance, distributed computing, bioinformatics, sensor systems, conceptual data querying, and software modeling.

Antonio M Baptista

Professor, Division of Environmental and Biomolecular Systems and Director, Center for Coastal Margin Observation & Prediction, both at the School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University.

Research interests are in understanding how coastal margins function under the complex influence of rivers, ocean, climate and humans – and how to integrate such understanding in broad-range societal decisions on sustainable development.

Peter Beerli

Professor in Scientific Computing; Training as an evolutionary biologist working with water frogs in the Mediterranean Sea; Distributor of the Bayesian population genetics inference program MIGRATE.
Interested in computational biology, in particular in computational population genetics and phylogenetics

Joanne Berghout

Dr. Berghout received her PhD in Biochemistry from McGill University in Montreal, QC where she researched the genetics of complex traits and susceptibility to infectious disease in humans and mouse models. Following that, she spent three years as the Outreach Coordinator for the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) database in Bar Harbor, ME. There, she trained researchers in genetics, genomics, data structures and data mining to answer biological questions, and worked closely with other members of the MGI group to develop and optimize the MGI resource. Now her research interests include genetics of all kinds, personalized medicine, big data, and scientific communication. She is currently pursuing projects in precision medicine for analysis of transcriptome data from patients with rare lung diseases (Sarcoidosis, Coccidiomycosis), and integrative network analysis of complex traits including Alzheimer's Disease. She is currently appointed at the University of Arizona's Center for Biomedical Informatics and Biostatistics (CB2) and The Center for Genetics and Genomic Medicine (TCG2M) in Tucson, AZ.

Christine L Borgman

Christine L. Borgman, Professor & Presidential Chair in Information Studies at UCLA, is the author Big Data, Little Data, No Data ( 2015), Scholarship in the Digital Age (2007) and From Gutenberg to the Global Information Infrastructure (2000), and about 200 other publications in information studies, computer science, and communication. She is a Fellow of the ACM and of AAAS; and a member of the Board of Directors of the Electronic Privacy Information Center.

Reed A Cartwright

Head of Human and Comparative Genomics Laboratory in the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University. Affiliated faculty with the Center for Evolution and Medicine, ASU.

My research is at the interface of genetics, statistics, and software development. I am primarily interested in developing statistical models to estimate evolutionary process from large, genomic datasets. Currently most of my research is connected to mutations.

Daniele D'Agostino

Daniele D'Agostino, Ph.D. is member of the “Computing Architectures and High Performance Computing of the Institute for Applied Mathematics and Information Technologies - Enrico Magenes (IMATI) of the National Research Council of Italy (CNR) since October 2001. The diffusion of parallel and distributed computing puts the activity on the research group at the forefront of many initiatives. The highlight is on the achievements of three related FP7 projects, DRIHMS, DRIHM, DRIHM2US, aimed at the design and implementation of a research e-Infrastructure for hydro-meteorology studies of extreme events.
He actively participated to the COST Action IC0805 Open European Network for High Performance Computing on Complex Environments, where IMATI has been Italian Member of the Management Committee. In 2014 he was a co-chair of the 22nd Euromicro International Conference on Parallel, Distributed and network based Processing. He co-authored more than 80 papers on international journals, books and conference proceedings. He acted also as co-guest editor of several special issues of ISI international.

David De Roure

David De Roure is Professor of e-Research at University of Oxford and Director of the Oxford e-Research Centre. He is a Strategic Advisor to the Economic and Social Research Council in the area of Social Media Data. Working on the intersection of humanities, social science, and computer science, David conducts research on social machines, computational musicology, large scale sociotechnical systems, cyber security and social computing.

Peter Denning

Distinguished professor of computer science at Naval Postgraduate School. Past president of ACM. Past editor in chief of Communications of ACM. Currently editor of ACM Ubiquity. Author of ten books, most recent Great Principles of Computing (MIT Press 2015). Author of over four hundred scientific papers and articles.

Ian Foster

I am a computer scientist with a predilection for building software systems (and, more recently, for deploying services) that solve problems in the sciences. I am a Distinguished Fellow at Argonne National Laboratory and a Professor at the University of Chicago. I am affiliated, in particular, with the Department of Computer Science, Mathematics and Computer Science Division, and Institute for Molecular Engineering.

Simon DW Frost

Reader in Pathogen Dynamics at the University of Cambridge; formerly Adjunct Associate Professor in the Dept. of Pathology, University of California San Diego (UCSD). Graduated with a BA in Natural Sciences (1st class), Trinity College, Cambridge (1992), DPhil in Mathematical Biology, Merton College, Oxford (1996). Postdoctoral positions at Princeton University, Oxford University, University of Edinburgh and UCSD. Awards include: NATO Postdoctoral Fellowship (1996), MRC Nonclinical Training Fellowship (1997-2000), a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award (2008-2013), and Thomson-Reuters Highly Cited Researcher awards in 2014, 2015, and 2016.

Nancy Griffeth

I have been teaching at Lehman College and the CUNY Graduate Center for 10 years, since 2003. My research specialty when I arrived was Computer Networks and I still teach Computer Networks as often as I can. I am now collaborating with Prof. Stephen Redenti, a biologist at Lehman, on a computational biology project to simulate migrating cells. We have recently introduced computational biology courses and a new minor in Quantitative and Systems Biology at Lehman.