Advisory Board and Editors Paleontology

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A one-page facts and stats PDF, to help when considering journal options with your co-authors.

Jérémy Anquetin

I received my PhD in Vertebrate Palaeontology from the University College London (UCL) and the Natural History Museum (NHM), London, UK. I notably specialize in the study of taxonomy, anatomy, and phylogeny of Mesozoic turtles. My current work is mainly focussed on Late Jurassic turtles from Europe.
Since Oct. 2015, I am a Senior Lecturer at the JURASSICA Museum in Porrentruy, Switzerland.

Richard M. Bateman

Visiting Professor, University of Reading/Royal Botanic Gardens Kew. Formerly Head, Dept. of Botany, Natural History Museum; Director of Science, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh; Head of Policy, Biosciences Federation. President, UK Hardy Orchid Society; Previously President, Systematics Association, Vice-President, European Society for Evolutionary-Developmental Genetics, Linnean Society of London, Botanical Society of the British Isles. Co-founder/editorial board member of six journals.

Rudiger Bieler

Curator (research professor) in the Integrative Research Center, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago and Lecturer in the Committee on Evolutionary Biology, University of Chicago

Research interests include evolutionary systematics, biogeography, comparative morphology, and taxonomy, with special focus on marine Mollusca, especially Gastropoda and Bivalvia. As a “museum person,” he is particularly interested in the development and application of organismal, collections-based research, ranging from extensive new field surveys and large-scale specimen and data management issues, to the integration of morphological, paleontological, and molecular data to address biological research questions. He recently served as lead PI of the Bivalve Assembling-the-Tree-of-Life (BivAToL.org) effort and is involved in coral reef restoration projects and associated invertebrate surveys in the Florida Keys. Past offices include service as president of the American Malacological Society and of the International Society of Malacology (Unitas), and he currently is a chief editor in the MolluscaBase.org effort.

Barry W Brook

Barry Brook, a conservation biologist and modeller, is an ARC Australian Laureate Professor and Chair of Environmental Sustainability at the University of Tasmania. Leader of the Dynamics of Eco-evolutionary Patterns (DEEP) research group and the UTAS node of CABAH, Barry is a highly cited scientist, having published three books, over 350 refereed papers, and many popular articles. His awards include the 2006 Australian Academy of Science Fenner Medal, the 2010 Community Science Educator of the Year and 2013 Scopus Researcher of the Year. He focuses on global change biology, ecological dynamics, paleoenvironments, energy systems, and statistical-simulation models.

Luis M Chiappe

Vice President for Research and Collections, and Director of the Dinosaur Institute, at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. Adjunct Professor of the University of Southern California. Research Fellow of the Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences. J. S. Guggenheim Fellow and recipient of the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award of the Humboldt Foundation.

Julia A Clarke

Julia Clarke is a paleontologist and evolutionary biologist at The University of Texas at Austin. She is also a John A. Wilson Centennial Fellow in Vertebrate Paleontology and a member of the Graduate Faculty in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior at UT.

She has a Ph.D. from the Department of Geology and Geophysics at Yale University and a B.A. (comparative literature and geobiology) from Brown University. She currently serves as co-editor-in-chief of the Journal of Anatomy and is an associate editor of Paleobiology. She has published numerous technical papers, including 9 in Nature or Science, and has been recognized for excellence in research, undergraduate teaching, and outreach.

Philip G Cox

My research is concerned with the mammalian skull and how it has been shaped by both evolution and function. I am interested in how the forces generated by feeding can influence cranial morphology. I investigate these issues using techniques such as geometric morphometrics and finite element analysis. I am fascinated by all mammals, but my current research is particularly focused on the rodents, as they display unique and highly specialised adaptations of the teeth and masticatory muscles.

Kenneth De Baets

I am a paleobiologist. My main research focuses on reproductive strategies and macroevolution, particularly on the relative contributions of biotic interactions (e.g., parasitism) and abiotic factors (e.g., climate) in driving these large-scale patterns. Other interests are quantitative methods to study biostratigraphy, intraspecific variability and paleobiology in general. My main tools for these purposes are invertebrates, mainly ammonoids (extinct cephalopods) and parasitic flatworms.

William A. DiMichele

Curator and Research Paleontologist, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC USA. Editorial board member: Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, Journal of Paleontology, Palaios. Former Editor, Paleobiology. Recipient of Geological Society of America Gilbert Cady Award in Coal Geology. Fellow of the Paleontological Society and Geological Society of America.

Robert Druzinsky

I am an evolutionary biologist and functional morphologist with diverse interests. My major focus is on the evolution of the masticatory apparatus of mammals, particularly rodents. I am also working on an anatomy ontology for muscles of the head and neck in tetrapods. I also study the biomechanics of teeth, as well as the neurophysiology of mastication.

Andrew A. Farke

Dr. Farke received a B.Sc. in Geology from the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in 2003, and completed his Ph.D. in Anatomical Sciences at Stony Brook University in 2008. He joined the staff at the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology in June 2008, as Augustyn Family Curator of Paleontology.

Peter T. Harris

I am a marine geoscientist with interests in ecology, palaeoenvironments, oceanography and management. From 1986-94 I worked at Sydney University as a Research Fellow and Senior Lecturer conducting ARC-funded research on tidal systems, particularly the Fly River delta in Torres Strait. In 1994, I accepted a position with Geoscience Australia to lead the Palaeo-environment Program at the Antarctic CRC in Hobart Tasmania. I conducted research on the Holocene sedimentary record of Antarctic bottom water formation and ice sheet advance/retreat. In July, 2003 I was appointed Group Leader for Geoscience Australia’s Marine & Coastal Environment Group, the largest marine geoscience applied research program in Australia, with programs in maritime boundaries (Law of the Sea), coastal geochemistry, OzCoasts web delivery of coastal science for managers, seabed mapping and characterisation, marine biodiversity and Antarctic research. In September, 2014, I was appointed Managing Director of GRID-Arendal in Arendal, Norway. The job involves working closely with UN-Environment in Nairobi to develop projects to support developing countries with solving their environmental problems. I developed the first global synthesis of submarine canyons (2011) and the first GIS global geomorphic features map of the oceans (2014). I will receive the 2018 Francis P. Shepard Medal for Marine Geology, awarded by the SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Research) – the first Australian to be so honoured.