Advisory Board and Editors Paleontology

Jérémy Anquetin

I received my PhD in Vertebrate Palaeontology from the University College London (UCL) and the Natural History Museum (NHM), London, UK. I notably specialize in the study of taxonomy, anatomy, and phylogeny of Mesozoic turtles. My current work is mainly focussed on Late Jurassic turtles from Europe.
Since Oct. 2015, I am a Senior Lecturer at the JURASSICA Museum in Porrentruy, Switzerland.

Richard M. Bateman

Visiting Professor, University of Reading/Royal Botanic Gardens Kew. Formerly Head, Dept. of Botany, Natural History Museum; Director of Science, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh; Head of Policy, Biosciences Federation. President, UK Hardy Orchid Society; Previously President, Systematics Association, Vice-President, European Society for Evolutionary-Developmental Genetics, Linnean Society of London, Botanical Society of the British Isles. Co-founder/editorial board member of six journals.

Luis M Chiappe

Vice President for Research and Collections, and Director of the Dinosaur Institute, at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. Adjunct Professor of the University of Southern California. Research Fellow of the Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences. J. S. Guggenheim Fellow and recipient of the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award of the Humboldt Foundation.

Julia A Clarke

Julia Clarke is a paleontologist and evolutionary biologist at The University of Texas at Austin.

Philip G Cox

My research is concerned with the mammalian skull and how it has been shaped by both evolution and function. I am interested in how the forces generated by feeding can influence cranial morphology. I investigate these issues using techniques such as geometric morphometrics and finite element analysis. I am fascinated by all mammals, but my current research is particularly focused on the rodents, as they display unique and highly specialised adaptations of the teeth and masticatory muscles.

Kenneth De Baets

I am a paleobiologist. My main research focuses on reproductive strategies and macroevolution, particularly on the relative contributions of biotic interactions (e.g., parasitism) and abiotic factors (e.g., climate) in driving these large-scale patterns. Other interests are quantitative methods to study biostratigraphy, intraspecific variability and paleobiology in general. My main tools for these purposes are invertebrates, mainly ammonoids (extinct cephalopods) and parasitic flatworms.

William A. DiMichele

Curator and Research Paleontologist, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC USA. Editorial board member: Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, Journal of Paleontology, Palaios, CR Paleoevol. Former Editor, Paleobiology. Recipient of Geological Society of America Gilbert Cady Award in Coal Geology. Fellow of the Paleontological Society and Geological Society of America.

Robert Druzinsky

I am an evolutionary biologist and functional morphologist with diverse interests. My major focus is on the evolution of the masticatory apparatus of mammals, particularly rodents. I am also working on an anatomy ontology for muscles of the head and neck in tetrapods. I also study the biomechanics of teeth, as well as the neurophysiology of mastication.

Andrew A. Farke

Dr. Farke received a B.Sc. in Geology from the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in 2003, and completed his Ph.D. in Anatomical Sciences at Stony Brook University in 2008. He joined the staff at the Alf Museum in June 2008, as Augustyn Family Curator of Paleontology.

John R. Hutchinson

Professor of Evolutionary Biomechanics at The Royal Veterinary College, University of London. Assoc Editor of Proc Roy Soc B, J Theor Biol. Royal Society Leverhulme Trust Senior Fellow 2012-2013. Fellow of the Linnean Society of London, Anatomical Society, Zoological Society of London and Royal Society of Biology. RCVS Share Jones Lecture in Anatomy (2011) and British Science Festival, Charles Darwin Award Lecture (2012). Honorary Professor, University of Queensland, Australia; Honorary Research Associate, University College London. Fellow of the Year, Anatomical Society (2015).

William L Jungers

B.A. in Anthropology from Oberlin College (1970), Ph.D. from University of Michigan in Biological Anthropology (1976). Faculty member at Stony Brook University School of Medicine since 1978. My research interests focus on the evolutionary and functional anatomy of primates and paleoanthropology, with a special interest in "size and scaling" and quantitative methods. I've also conducted paleontological field work in Madagascar and Indonesia.

Fabien F. Knoll

Fabien Knoll is a vertebrate palaeontologist at the University of Manchester. He received his PhD from the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Paris. His research interests focus on the palaeobiology and evolution of archosaurs.