Advisory Board and Editors Marine Biology

Journal Factsheet
A one-page PDF to help when considering journal options with co-authors
Download Factsheet
I told my colleagues that PeerJ is a journal where they need to publish if they want their paper to be published quickly and with the strict peer review expected from a good journal.
Sohath Vanegas,
PeerJ Author
View author feedback

Susana Agusti

Dr. Susana Agusti is Professor of Marine Science at KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology) at the Red Sea Research Center, and Adjunct Professor at the University of Tromsø (Norway).

She holds Bachelors and Ph.D. degrees from the Autonomous University of Madrid.
Formerly she was Research Professor with the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), and Professorial Fellow with the UWA Oceans Institute and the School of Plant Biology at the University of Western Australia (Australia).

Anastazia Teresa Banaszak

Research Professor at the Unidad Académica de Sistemas Arrecifales (Reef Systems Academic Unit) a campus of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México located in Puerto Morelos in the Mexican Caribbean. Her undergraduate education was at James Cook University, Townsville, Australia followed by her graduate degree at the University of California at Santa Barbara, USA and a postdoctoral appointment at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Maryland, USA.

Her research interests include the photobiology of phytoplankton, corals and coral reef dwelling-organisms as well as coral reproductive biology and ecology. Most recently, she has become involved in research on best practices for culturing coral species for use in restoration projects.

She is a topic editor for Coral Reefs, council member of the International Society for Reef Studies and serves on the scientific advisory boards for the Healthy Reefs Initiative and SECORE International and is on the steering committees of the Coral Restoration Consortium and the Meso-American Reef Restoration Group.

Michael Beman

The overarching goal of my research program is to develop a predictive understanding of microbial ecology and biogeochemistry in the ‘Anthropocene’ sea. My research sits at the interface of microbial ecology, biogeochemistry, and global change science, and I work worldwide in reefs and estuaries, marine lakes and mountain lakes, and the open ocean. I focus on the responses of microbial communities, and the processes mediated by these communities, to environmental change—including climate change, ocean acidification, and ocean deoxygenation.

I received a B.S. from Yale University and a Ph.D. from Stanford in Geological and Environmental Sciences; before joining the UC Merced faculty in 2009, where I was a postdoc in Marine Environmental Biology at USC, a lecturer at UCLA, and an Assistant Researcher at the University of Hawai’i. I am an Associate Professor and member of the Sierra Nevada Research Institute and the Environmental Systems and Quantitative and Systems Biology graduate groups.

Mark C. Benfield

Professor in the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, College of the Coast and Environment at Louisiana State University. Adjunct (Guest Investigator) in the Biology Department at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Member and Past-Chair of the ICES Working Group on Zooplankton Ecology, member of the ICES Working Group on Integrated Morphological and Molecular Taxonomy, Director of the Gulf SERPENT Project. Ph.D. (Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences) from Texas A&M University.

John A Berges

Professor in Biological Sciences and Freshwater Sciences. PhD Biological Oceanography, U. British Columbia. Postdoctoral work, Brookhaven National Laboratory. Fellow of the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography. Research interests include marine and freshwater phytoplankton and zooplankton ecophysiology and biochemistry, including molecular (e.g. evolution of cell death proteases) and biomathematical (e.g. agent-based modelling) approaches.

Angelo F Bernardino

PhD in Biological Oceanography and Associate Professor of Oceanography at Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Brazil. Interested in Marine Biology, Marine Ecology, Deep-Sea Biology and Conservation, Estuarine ecology, Biological Oceanography, Climate change impacts on marine ecosystems.

Punyasloke Bhadury

I study microbial complexity (biocomplexity) across coastal oceans to understand how ocean geochemistry has shaped plasticity and consequences for key ecosystem processes such as carbon and nitrogen cycling. I am particularly interested to address the link between land-ocean-atmosphere in shaping microbial complexity across oceanic realms. I also have keen interests in metazoan biogeography, biomonitoring of aquatic ecosystems and elucidating resilience in microbes. I use geochemical, microscopy and molecular tools (e.g. eDNA, genomics) to address these questions.

Rüdiger Bieler

Curator (research professor) in the Integrative Research Center, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago and Member of the Committee on Evolutionary Biology, University of Chicago

Research interests include evolutionary systematics, biogeography, comparative morphology, and taxonomy, with special focus on marine Mollusca, especially Gastropoda and Bivalvia. As a “museum person,” he is particularly interested in the development and application of organismal, collections-based research, ranging from extensive new field surveys and large-scale specimen and data management issues, to the integration of morphological, paleontological, and molecular data to address biological research questions. He recently served as lead PI of the Bivalve Assembling-the-Tree-of-Life (BivAToL.org) effort and is involved in coral reef restoration projects and associated invertebrate surveys in the Florida Keys. Past offices include service as president of the American Malacological Society and of the International Society of Malacology (Unitas), and he currently is a chief editor in the MolluscaBase.org effort.

P. Dee Boersma

Wadsworth Endowed Chair in Conservation Science and Prof. of Biology, University of Washington, Director for Center for Ecosystem Sentinels and the Wildlife Conservation Society Magellanic Penguin Project, and Adjunct Curator of Ornithology, Burke Museum. Recipient of 2012 Ocean Conservation Award Aquarium of the Pacific, 2010 Nature Conservancy of Washington Environmental Hero, 2009 Annual Heinz Award for the Environment. Former President of the Society of Conservation Biology. For selected publications go to ecosystemsentinels.org.

Isabella C. Bordon

Bachelor of Science - Biology (Sao Paulo State University-UNESP/Brazil); Master of Science (Fisheries Institute of Sao Paulo State); PhD. (Nuclear and Energy Research Institute-IPEN/Brazil). Post doc - UNESP/Brazil and University of Sao Paulo -USP/Brazil.

Previous experiences include Biomonitoring and Environmental Chemistry (metals).

Interests in new projects includes Environmental sustainability in Production Engineering and R&D

Holly A Bowers

My research interests have focused on molecular detection of harmful algal bloom (HAB) species and diversity in estuarine systems, including Chesapeake and Monterey Bays. HABs have become a recurring nuisance along the world’s coastlines and inland lake systems, affecting local economies through impacts on food/drinking water supplies and recreation. Tools that provide rapid, high-resolution data on species presence and abundance are key to ongoing monitoring programs to protect these areas. Taking it a step further, it is just as important to uncover information on how HAB species fluctuate with respect to population structure in between bloom events. Myriad factors can influence species composition, toxin production, and duration of bloom events - molecular fingerprinting plays a key role in untangling this complicated picture.