Marina Kalyuzhnaya
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Marina George Kalyuzhnaya


Summary

Education:

2000 – PhD. (Microbiology). Center for Microbiology and Biotechnology//Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia
1994 – BS/ MS (Biology, Microbiology). Dnepropetrovsk State University, Department of Microbiology, Ukraine
1994 – Pre-doctoral training in “Molecular Biology, Gene Engineering and Biotechnology” M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia.

Positions Held:
2015 - Assistant Professor, San Diego State University
2015 - Affiliate Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology, University of Washington
2013 - 2015 Visiting Scholar, SIO, University of California San Diego
2012 - 2015 Research Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology, University of Washington
2006 - 2012 Research Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology, University of Washington
2001 - 2006 Research Associate, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington
1997 - 2002 Junior Research Scientist, G.K. Skryabin Institute of Biochemistry & Physiology of Microorganisms, Russian Academy of 1995 - 1997 Sciences Engineer-investigator, G.K. Skryabin Institute of Biochemistry & Physiology of Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences

Biochemistry Bioengineering Microbiology Molecular Biology

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Work details

Assistant Professor

San Diego State University
January 2015
Biology
Anthropogenic methane emissions are key drivers of global warming. While it is recognized that methane mitigation is critical to the health and well-being of mankind, an ideal system that could diminish the impact of fugitive methane has not yet been elucidated. Research in my group is centered on understanding biological methane conversion in nature and applying newly discovered explicit principles to support a sustainable environment and adaptation to climate change. Our research effort includes: 1) characterization of key elements (enzymes, regulators) essential for microbial methane utilization, via elucidation of the topology, evolution, and functional plasticity of the related metabolic pathways; 2) understanding key mechanisms supporting microbe-microbe or microbe-host interactions; and 3) development of novel sustainable approaches for methane capturing and conversion into next generation chemicals and fuels. Over the years my team has developed a collection of methane-consuming microbes, many with great biotechnological potential. In 2012, we led the largest effort of the international OMeGA consortium on sequencing genomes of model methanotrophs, which, in turn, allowed us to establish novel modes of methane metabolism and to construct metabolic models. The team plays an active role in the methanotrophy field, contributing to workshops and panels on methane mitigation, training graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, as well as consulting with biotech companies on the metabolic aspects of methane biocatalysis.