Advisory Board and Editors Anatomy & Physiology

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Virginia Abdala

Professor of General Biology, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, Argentina. Researcher at the CONICET, Tucuman, Argentina. Member of the Instituto de Biodiversidad Neotropical, UNT-CONICET, Argentina.

Tjeerd Boonstra

Senior Research Scientist at the University of New South Wales working on complex network analysis (brain networks, muscle networks and social networks), electrophysiology, motor control and mental health.

Ebba Brakenhielm

INSERM Tenured Researcher in the field of Cardiovascular Research, currently focusing on therapeutic angiogenesis with polymer-based targeted growth factor delivery.

PhD in Tumor Biology (Pr Yihai Cao, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden), and expertise in Adipose tissue angiogenesis. Postdoc at UCLA (Pr Lily Wu) in molecular imaging and tumor lymphangiogenesis field.

Member of European Vascular Biology Organisation, French society for Cardiovascular Research, French society for Angiogenesis Research.

Luis M Chiappe

Vice President for Research and Collections, and Director of the Dinosaur Institute, at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. Adjunct Professor of the University of Southern California. Research Fellow of the Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences. J. S. Guggenheim Fellow and recipient of the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award of the Humboldt Foundation.

Julia A Clarke

Julia Clarke is a paleontologist and evolutionary biologist at The University of Texas at Austin. She is also a John A. Wilson Centennial Fellow in Vertebrate Paleontology and a member of the Graduate Faculty in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior at UT.

She has a Ph.D. from the Department of Geology and Geophysics at Yale University and a B.A. (comparative literature and geobiology) from Brown University. She currently serves as co-editor-in-chief of the Journal of Anatomy and is an associate editor of Paleobiology. She has published numerous technical papers, including 9 in Nature or Science, and has been recognized for excellence in research, undergraduate teaching, and outreach.

Philip G Cox

My research is concerned with the mammalian skull and how it has been shaped by both evolution and function. I am interested in how the forces generated by feeding can influence cranial morphology. I investigate these issues using techniques such as geometric morphometrics and finite element analysis. I am fascinated by all mammals, but my current research is particularly focused on the rodents, as they display unique and highly specialised adaptations of the teeth and masticatory muscles.

Tim L A Doyle

Dr Tim Doyle is a biomechanics and physical performance researcher. He has a broad network having studied within Australia (The University of Queensland, Edith Cowan University) and overseas at Ball State University in the USA. In addition to his academic qualifications he is also an accredited level 2 strength and conditioning coach (ASCA) and an accredited level 2 sport scientist (ESSA). He was awarded an Endeavour Executive Fellowship which provided the opportunity to spend time at The Mayo Clinic. His research involves neuromuscular biomechanics, injury prevention, and physical preparation in athletes and tactical populations.

Robert Druzinsky

I am an evolutionary biologist and functional morphologist with diverse interests. My major focus is on the evolution of the masticatory apparatus of mammals, particularly rodents. I am also working on an anatomy ontology for muscles of the head and neck in tetrapods. I also study the biomechanics of teeth, as well as the neurophysiology of mastication.

Andrew A. Farke

Dr. Farke received a B.Sc. in Geology from the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in 2003, and completed his Ph.D. in Anatomical Sciences at Stony Brook University in 2008. He joined the staff at the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology in June 2008, as Augustyn Family Curator of Paleontology.

John Garthwaite

Professor of Experimental Neuroscience, Wolfson Inst for Biomedical Research, University College London.

Jason M.R. Gill

Professor of Cardio-metabolic Health in the Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences at the University of Glasgow. Lead an active multi-disciplinary research group investigating the effects of exercise and diet on the prevention and management of vascular and metabolic diseases from the molecular to the whole-body level. Major research interests include: why certain population groups appear to be particularly susceptible to the adverse effects of a ‘Westernised’ lifestyle, and how lifestyle interventions can modulate this excess risk; the interactions between physical activity, energy balance, body fatness and disease risk; and the mechanisms by which exercise regulates lipoprotein metabolism. Member of the NICE guidelines update committee for prevention of type 2 diabetes, and was member of development groups for the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) guidelines for the prevention and treatment of obesity and for prevention of cardiovascular disease. Past Chair of the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES) Division of Physical Activity for Health and Fellow of BASES. Director of the MSc programme in Sport and Exercise Science & Medicine at the University of Glasgow.

Naoto Haruyama

Associate professor, Section of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Japan.
Received his D.D.S (1998) and Ph.D. (2002) in Dentistry from Tohoku University, Japan.
Postdoc at NIDCR/NIH in the U.S. from 2004-2007.
Physician Scientist for patients with cleft lip/palate and/or other congenital anomalies.
Research: biomineralization, extracellular matrix proteins in teeth, tooth movement, and congenital anomalies.