Academic Editors

The following people constitute the Editorial Board of Academic Editors for PeerJ. These active academics are the Editors who seek peer reviewers, evaluate their responses, and make editorial decisions on each submission to the journal. Learn more about becoming an Editor.

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Todd A Anderson

President's Excellence in Research Professor in the Department of Environmental Toxicology and The Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH) at Texas Tech University. Elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2005. Board Certified Environmental Scientist (BCES), by eminence, from the American Academy of Environmental Engineers & Scientists (AAEES).

Gerhard Andersson

Professor of Clinical Psychology at Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. Also researcher at Karolinska Institute, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm, Sweden. Clinical psychologist at the ENT department, Linköping University Hospital. Linköping Sweden. President, European Society for Research on Internet Interventions; Past president and co-founder, International Society for Research on Internet Interventions.

My S Andersson

Dr Andersson is an Assistant Professor in Experimental Neurology at Lund University and group leader of Cellular Neurophysiology and Epilepsy group. Her research focuses on underlying mechanisms of and new treatments for epilepsy in the developing brain. This is done using different methods, the main one being electrophysiology, in vivo and in vitro.

Nigel R Andrew

My current research interests focus on the impacts that climate change will have on insect behaviour, ecology and physiology; insect community structure along environmental gradients; and insect-plant interactions.
I am currently Editor-in-Chief of Austral Ecology.

Alexandre Anesio

Alexandre Magno Anesio is a Professor of Biogeochemistry in the School of Geographical Sciences at the University of Bristol. He is also the Director for the Bristol Glaciology Centre. Anesio gained his PhD in 2000 from Sweden and came to the UK as a Marie Curie postdoctoral fellow in 2003. His research interests are broad, and he combines concepts from Geography, Biology and Chemistry to understand the carbon and nutrient cycle in the cryosphere. In the past 14 years, Anesio has conducted fieldwork in the Arctic, including on the Greenland Ice Sheet and Greenland glaciers (e.g., Kangerlussuaq, Zackenberg, Tassilaq) to demonstrate the impact of microbial processes on a) albedo reduction, b) production, accumulation and export of organic carbon and nutrients to downstream ecosystems and c) the diversity and biogeochemical cycles of subglacial environments. He has secured grants as PI from a variety of sources which includes the UK Research Council (NERC), UK Charities (e.g., Leverhulme Trust, Nuffield Foundation) and the EU (Marie Curie Fellowship and Innovative Training Network). Anesio was elected the 2016 Distinguished Lecturer by the European Geochemistry Association.

Maria Anisimova

Since 2014, senior research fellow and lecturer at the Institute of Applied Simulations of the Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW). Editor of BMC Evol Biol and PLoS ONE. In 2012 edited a book in 2 volumes "Evolutionary Genomics: Statistical and computational methods".

Jérémy Anquetin

I received my PhD in Vertebrate Palaeontology from the University College London (UCL) and the Natural History Museum (NHM), London, UK. I notably specialize in the study of taxonomy, anatomy, and phylogeny of Mesozoic turtles. My current work is mainly focussed on Late Jurassic turtles from Europe.
Since Oct. 2015, I am a Senior Lecturer at the JURASSICA Museum in Porrentruy, Switzerland.

Rodolfo Aramayo

My laboratory is centered on understanding the function(s) of RNAs, especially non-coding RNAs in all aspects of Biology. The long term objective of our work is to understand meiotic silencing in Neurospora and to map its connections with the meiotic silencing observed in other organisms.

B.S. in Molecular Biology, University of Brasilia, 1982
M.S. in Molecular Biology, University of Brasilia, 1986
Ph.D. in Genetics, University of Georgia (Athens), 1992
Postdoctoral Training, University of Wisconsin Madison, 1993
Postdoctoral Training, Stanford University, 1997

Praveen Arany

Training: Dentistry, Biomedical Research, Bioengineering, Pathology
Postdoctoral: TGF-beta, wound healing, regeneration, radiation biology, light biology, stem cells, biomaterial, Lasers.
Current: Clinical translational research and molecular mechanism.
Positions: Past-President, NAALT; President-Elect WALT, Co-Chair SPIE, Chair, ASLMS
Interests: Signal Transduction, Lasers, Biological regulation, Photobiomodulation.

Elizabeth A Archie

Associate Professor of Biology at the University of Notre Dame. Associate Director of the Amboseli Baboon Research Project in Kenya. Elizabeth Archie received her PhD from Duke University. She was an undergraduate at Bowdoin College.

The goal of our research is to understand the evolutionary costs and benefits of social relationships, especially how these evolutionary consequences pertain to individual health, disease risk, and survival.

Our research follows two main strands:

* How do social organization and behavior influence the spread of infectious organisms, including bacteria and parasites?
* How does an individual’s social context influence their physiology, immune responses, and life span?

Avelino F Arellano

Associate Professor of Data Assimilation and Atmospheric Chemistry at the Department of Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Arizona (UA). He is also a faculty member of the following UA Graduate Interdisciplinary Programs (GIDP): Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis and Applied Mathematics.

His research focuses on investigating human fingerprints in the atmosphere. His research combines numerical models and observations to study atmospheric constituents, especially those emitted from combustion-related activities, and how these constituents affect air quality, weather, climate, and our environment.

Carmen Arena

Carmen Arena is Associate Professor in Ecology at the Department of Biology of the University of Naples Federico II. She conducts researches in the ecological disciplines, dealing with studies concerning photosynthesis and morpho-functional adaptation strategies of higher plants in response to mono and multiple stresses in natural and controlled environments, with applications in ecological and agronomic field and space-oriented research.

The research activity holds three main issues:
1) Regulation of the photosynthetic process in response to abiotic ecological factors in the context of environmental change.
2) Study of plant growth in an extra-terrestrial environment.
3) Plant-soil interactions in natural and anthropized ecosystems.
These researches include a) the eco-physiological response of crop species to light quality; (b) the morpho-functional strategies of plant in phytoremediation studies (c)) the relationship between soil pollution, edaphic communities and photosynthesis in higher plants used in biomonitoring studies.
C. Arena is author of more than 120 publications, 80 of them peer-reviewed ISI-WoS/Scopus, and participated to more than 150 National and International congresses and workshops, most of them as speaker and invited speaker.