Advisory Board and Editors Statistics

David B Allison

Distinguished Professor, Quetelet Endowed Professor of Public Health, Associate Dean for Science, Director of Office of Energetics, and Director of the Nutrition Obesity Research Center; Authored over 450 peer-reviewed publications and five books. 2012 IOM Member. 2002 ILSI Board of Trustees. Elected Fellow ASA, APA, & AAAS. 2002 Andre Mayer Award from IASO; 2009 ASN Centrum Award; 2002 Lilly Scientific Achievement Award & 2009 TOPS Award from the Obesity Society; 2006 NSF PAESMEM Award.

Adam Auton

Assistant Professor of Computation Genetics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, NY.

Reed A Cartwright

Head of Human and Comparative Genomics Laboratory in the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University. Affiliated faculty with the Center for Evolution and Medicine, ASU.

My research is at the interface of genetics, statistics, and software development. I am primarily interested in developing statistical models to estimate evolutionary process from large, genomic datasets. Currently most of my research is connected to mutations.

Jun Chen

Assistant Professor of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic. Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. My research concerns the development and application of powerful and robust statistical methods for high-dimensional "omics" data, arising from modern high-throughput technologies such as microarray and next-generation sequencing. I am particularly interested in methods for microbiome sequencing data. Much of this effort is motivated by ongoing collaborations in projects that study the role of the human microbiome in disease pathogenesis using metagenomic sequencing.

Research interests include statistical genetics, genomics and metagenomics; and high-dimensional statistics.

Gary S Collins

Gary has research interests primarily focussed on statistical (and reporting) aspects in developing and validating multivariable prediction models. He has published over 100 papers on clinical trials, observational studies, systematic reviews, quality of life, propensity scores and prediction models.

Gary is a statistical editor ("hanging committee") for the BMJ.

Gary also led the development of the TRIPOD Statement for reporting clinical prediction models -

Xiangqin Cui

Xiangqin Cui is an associate professor in the Biostatistics Department, Section on Statistical Genetics, at University of Alabama at Birmingham. She received her Ph.D in Genetics at Iowa State University in 2001 and a three-year postdoctoral training in statistical genetics at the Jackson Laboratory afterwards. Her research is on experimental design and data analyses of high-throughput experiments including microarray, next-generation sequencing, statistical genetics/genomics, epigenomics.

Martin Daumer

Dr Martin Daumer: Director of the SLCMSR e.v. - The Human Motion Institute in Munich and managing director of the IT company, Trium Analysis Online GmbH. He is also visiting lecturer for Telemedicine and Clinical Applications of Computational Medicine at the Technical University Munich.

Dr Daumer received a diploma in Physics in 1990 and a Ph.D. in mathematics from the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich in 1995, after having worked at CERN, Switzerland, and Rutgers University, USA.

Charlotte M. Deane

Professor of Structural Biology and Director of the Systems Approaches to Biomedical Sciences Industrial Doctoral Centre at Oxford University.

Aaron M. Ellison

Senior Research Fellow at the Harvard Forest and Adjunct Professor at the University of Massachuestts; Editor-in-Chief of Ecological Monographs; Presidential Faculty Fellow (US National Science Foundation), Eminent Ecologist (Kellogg Biological Station), Distinguished Visiting Professor (University of Miami), Distinguished Ecologist (Michigan Technical University), Ledermann Lecturer in Natural History and Cosnervation Biology (University of Rhode Island), Fellow (Ecological Society of America)

Barbara E. Engelhardt

Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Princeton University. My group develops statistical models and methods for high-dimensional genomic data, modeling human genetic variation and its impact on gene expression and splicing, with the goal of identifying mechanisms of human disorders and diseases.

Rui Feng

I have been developing and applying statistical models and algorithms in genetics and genomics for more than 10 years. I have contributed both methodological and applied work in family-base studies, copy number variation analysis, genome-wide association studies, and next generation sequence data analysis.