Advisory Board and Editors Animal Behavior

PeerJ Factsheet
A one-page facts and stats PDF, to help when considering journal options with your co-authors.

Nigel R. Andrew

My current research interests focus on the impacts that climate change will have on insect behaviour, ecology and physiology; insect community structure along environmental gradients; and insect-plant interactions.
I am currently Managing Editor of Austral Ecology.

Elizabeth A Archie

Associate Professor of Biology at the University of Notre Dame. Associate Director of the Amboseli Baboon Research Project in Kenya. Elizabeth Archie received her PhD from Duke University. She was an undergraduate at Bowdoin College.

The goal of our research is to understand the evolutionary costs and benefits of social relationships, especially how these evolutionary consequences pertain to individual health, disease risk, and survival.

Our research follows two main strands:

* How do social organization and behavior influence the spread of infectious organisms, including bacteria and parasites?
* How does an individual’s social context influence their physiology, immune responses, and life span?

Louise Barrett

Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Cognition, Evolution and Behaviour; Member of Directorate, Institute of Child and Youth Studies, University of Lethbridge; Executive Editor, Animal Behaviour 2006-2011; Editor, Advances in the Study of Animal Behaviour; Past Member of Council, Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

George E Bentley

Professor of Integrative Biology and Neuroscience.
Director, UC Berkeley Field Station for the Study of Behavior, Ecology and Reproduction. Editorial Board of Domestic Animal Endocrinology, Frontiers in Systems and Integrative Pharmacology, Frontiers in Endocrinology

Susan M Bertram

My research addresses how genetic and environmental variation is maintained in sexually selected traits. My students and I use an animal behavior approach that incorporates tools from nutritional ecology, ecological physiology, and quantitative genetics. Our laboratory-based empirical research quantifies the phenotypic and genetically based variation in condition, life-history traits, and sexually selected traits and determines how this variation is influenced by diet and physiology.

Björn Brembs

- Dr. rer. nat., Dept. Genetics and Neurobiology, Universität Würzburg, 2000
- PostDoc, Dept. Neurobiology & Anatomy, University of Texas, Houston Health Science Center, 2000-2003
- Independent Researcher, Institute of Biology - Neurobiology, Freie Universität Berlin, 2003-2009
- Habilitation in Zoology, Freie Universität Berlin, 2009
- Heisenberg Fellow of the DFG, Institute of Biology - Neurobiology, Freie Universität Berlin, 2009-2012
- Adjunct professor, Department of Genetics, Universität Leipzig, Apr-Sep. 2012
- Professor of Neurogenetics, Institute of Zoology, Universität Regensburg, 2012-present

Caroline Brennan

I did my PhD at King's College London in the Lab of Prof J.M. Littleton working on adaptive mechanisms underlying drug dependence. I demonstrated adaptive changes in the number of DHP sensitive VOCC following chronic exposure to central depressant drugs and showed that these changes were associated with genetic vulnerability to drug dependence.

I undertook post-doc training at the Clinical Research Centre Harrow, UK before joining the laboratory of Prof Nigel Holder at The Randall Institute, KCL and moving with him to UCL in 1998. Whilst at KCL and UCL I used zebrafish as a genetic model system for analysis of mechanisms underlying development.

Since 2000, I have been a Lecturer in Molecular Genetics in the School of Biological Sciences QMUL. Our work combines the two areas of my expertise: Molecular mechanisms underlying drug dependence and zebrafish as a developmental genetic model system. We have developed behavioural assays of drug seeking, compulsive drug seeking and relapse in zebrafish and are establishing lines of fish in which to explore the genetics contributing to these behaviours.

Sarah F. Brosnan

I study the evolution of decision-making and economic behavior across the primate Order. I am particularly interested in how non-human primates make decisions, especially about cooperation, and how they are altered based on social and ecological contexts.

I am currently an Assistant Professor of Psychology, Philosophy & Neuroscience at Georgia State University and direct the Laboratory for Comparative Economic & Behavioral Studies. I am on the editorial board of several open access journals.

Darren Burke

I am an Associate Professor in the School of Psychology, based at the Ourimbah campus of the University of Newcastle. I am an Experimental Psychologist, interested in the evolution of Visual, Spatial and Social abilities. Understanding how these various behavioural mechanisms evolved involves integrating data derived from studies in humans and non-humans and from research examining the neural, cognitive and social determinants of the abilities.

Andrew W Byrne

Veterinary epidemiologist at the Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Belfast, UK, and an Honorary Lecturer at the School of Biological Sciences, Queen's University Belfast, UK. My research interests are primarily focused on infectious disease in wildlife and domestic hosts, wildlife ecology and management, and the concept of "one health".

Jean Clobert

Senior Researcher (DR hc, CNRS), Station de Ecologie Experimentale du CNRS à Moulis. Member of the Acamedia Europaea.

After having developed statistical methods for the study of population dynamics in nature, my research focus has shifted since 15 years towards the study of three main topic :

* The study of dispersal evolution (causes, mechanisms and consequences). The approaches which have been developed are demographic, physiological, behavioural and genetic. Three model systems have been chosen to study the genetic and plastic responses of dispersal to variations in the environment, two lizards species, the common lizard (Lacerta vivipara, coll M. Massot) and the side blotched lizard (Uta stansburiana.coll B. Sinervo), and a ciliate (Tetrahymena thermophila).
* The study of trade offs and phenotypic plasticity. I have been interested by the link between predation/parasitism and clutch size or/other traits evolution. I alm also interested by the evolution, control and organisation of trade-offs, in particular with respect to phenotypic plasticity.
* Population structure and extinction rate. We examine the role of the different sources of heterogeneity (demographic environmental) and in particular internal (mating system, polymorphism, type of competition) in population viability.

David W Coltman

Professor and Associate Dean (Research), Faculty of Science, University of Alberta.

I work in the general area of conservation genetics and ecological genomics in wildlife.