Advisory Board and Editors Ecology

PeerJ Factsheet
A one-page facts and stats PDF, to help when considering journal options with your co-authors.

Susana Agusti

Dr. Susana Agusti is Professor of Marine Science at KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology) at the Red Sea Research Center, and Adjunct Professor at the University of Tromsø (Norway).

She holds Bachelors and Ph.D. degrees from the Autonomous University of Madrid.
Formerly she was Research Professor with the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), and Professorial Fellow with the UWA Oceans Institute and the School of Plant Biology at the University of Western Australia (Australia).

Anthony S Amend

Assistant Professor in the department of Botany, and faculty in the Ecology Evolution and Conservation Biology program at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

Per-Arne Amundsen

Per-Arne Amundsen is a Professor in freshwater ecology at Department of Arctic and Marine Biology, Faculty of Biosciences, Fisheries and Economics, UiT The Arctic University of Norway. His primary research interests comprise ecology of freshwater fish communities and ecosystems, ecological interactions including predation, competition and parasitism, trophic ecology and food-web interactions, evolutionary ecology and speciation, invasion biology, and management and conservation. He has been leading and involved in a number of research projects, including several long-term ecological studies of freshwater fish and lake communities and ecosystems.

Nigel R. Andrew

My current research interests focus on the impacts that climate change will have on insect behaviour, ecology and physiology; insect community structure along environmental gradients; and insect-plant interactions.
I am currently Managing Editor of Austral Ecology.

Alexandre Anesio

Alexandre Magno Anesio is a Professor of Biogeochemistry in the School of Geographical Sciences at the University of Bristol. He is also the Director for the Bristol Glaciology Centre. Anesio gained his PhD in 2000 from Sweden and came to the UK as a Marie Curie postdoctoral fellow in 2003. His research interests are broad, and he combines concepts from Geography, Biology and Chemistry to understand the carbon and nutrient cycle in the cryosphere. In the past 14 years, Anesio has conducted fieldwork in the Arctic, including on the Greenland Ice Sheet and Greenland glaciers (e.g., Kangerlussuaq, Zackenberg, Tassilaq) to demonstrate the impact of microbial processes on a) albedo reduction, b) production, accumulation and export of organic carbon and nutrients to downstream ecosystems and c) the diversity and biogeochemical cycles of subglacial environments. He has secured grants as PI from a variety of sources which includes the UK Research Council (NERC), UK Charities (e.g., Leverhulme Trust, Nuffield Foundation) and the EU (Marie Curie Fellowship and Innovative Training Network). Anesio was elected the 2016 Distinguished Lecturer by the European Geochemistry Association.

Thomas Backhaus

Professor for Ecotoxicology and Environmental Sciences at the University of Gothenburg, with a main interest in regulatory (eco)toxicology and risk assessment of complex exposure situations.

Volker Bahn

I am an Associate Professor of Biological Sciences at Wright State University. Previously I was a postdoctoral fellow at McGill University working in Macroecology with Brian McGill. My PhD is from the University of Maine in Wildlife Ecology with advisers Bill Krohn and Raymond O'Connor, and MS (German Diplom) in Conservation Biology from Philipps University Marburg with Harald Plachter and Peter Poschlod, in collaboration with Alan Burger from University of Victoria.

Teri Balser

Professor Teri Balser is Dean of Teaching and Learning for the Faculty of Science and Engineering at Curtin University, where she came after having been Dean of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the University of Florida. She received a Ph.D. in soil microbiology came from the University of California at Berkeley, and she completed postdoctoral research in ecosystem ecology at Stanford University. She is a Fellow of the Soil Science Society of America, and was recently named to the Australian Research Council College of Experts.

Her research centers on understanding microbial community-level ecophysiological responses to stress, disturbance, and change, and the consequences of these for ecosystem functioning. She has worked in countries worldwide studying restoration, carbon sequestration, invasive species, biodiversity, and land use/land cover.

In addition to international recognition as an accomplished research scholar, Dr. Balser is widely known in higher education as a change agent and leader in Science, Technology Engineering and Math education (STEM). She is a co-founder of the Society for Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER), a National Vision and Change Fellow with the Partnership for Undergraduate Life Sciences Education (PULSE), and was a Fulbright-Nehru Distinguished Chair to India in 2015 to help build capacity at the national level for pedagogically advanced and responsive STEM education.

Anastazia T Banaszak

Research Professor at the Unidad Académica de Sistemas Arrecifales (Reef Systems Academic Unit) a campus of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México located in Puerto Morelos in the Mexican Caribbean. Her undergraduate education was at James Cook University, Townsville, Australia followed by her graduate degree at the University of California at Santa Barbara, USA and a postdoctoral appointment at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Maryland, USA.

Her research interests include the photobiology of phytoplankton, corals and coral reef dwelling-organisms as well as coral reproductive biology and ecology. Most recently, she has become involved in research on best practices for culturing coral species for use in restoration projects.

She is a topic editor for Coral Reefs, council member of the International Society for Reef Studies and serves on the scientific advisory boards for the Healthy Reefs Initiative and SECORE International and is on the steering committees of the Coral Restoration Consortium and the Meso-American Reef Restoration Group.

Nathan Basiliko

Nathan Basiliko is a faculty member and Canada Research Chair in Environmental Microbiology at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario. His group combines new molecular tools with more classical approaches in ecosystem sciences and soil microbiology to study how forest and wetland soil biota respond to resource management, climate change, and other stressors in the Great Lakes St. Lawrence (northern temperate hardwood) and Boreal Forest regions. Dr. Basiliko also explores general controls on microbial diversity in soils, links between diversity and activity, and how different soil microbial communities transform plant tissues into soil organic matter and then subsequently decompose this organic matter to mineral products, including greenhouse gases. Prior to joining Laurentian in 2013, he was a faculty member at the University of Toronto and a post-doctoral fellow in Forest Sciences at the University of British Columbia. He completed his bachelors in Natural Resources at Cornell University and doctorate in Physical Geography at McGill University.

Ugo Bastolla

I got my PhD in Physics at Rome University, working with Luca Peliti and Giorgio Parisi on biologically inspired problems: evolutionary models and Boolean networks. Since then, I have always been interested in computational biology: Protein folding, Stability and population biology constraints in protein evolution, Conformation changes in proteins, Structural evolution of proteins, Theoretical ecology, Ecological interactions among microorganisms.

Amanda E Bates

The global redistribution of species is leading to large-scale community change. Gaining a process-based understanding for what factors create species and community resilience under environmental variability is an important research objective for our time. My research aims to address this theme by linking physiological thresholds of organisms to the environment they experience to quantify changes in species distributions, the outcome of species interactions, and community patterns. My approach is to link spatial and temporal trends in abiotic variables at biologically relevant scales using standardized experimental protocols, complementary laboratory and field approaches, meta-analytic approaches, and modern statistical tools.