Advisory Board and Editors Biogeochemistry

PeerJ Factsheet
A one-page facts and stats PDF, to help when considering journal options with your co-authors.

Samuel Abiven

I am group leader at the university of Zurich, department of geography. My research and teaching deal with biogeochemical cycles (mainly carbon and nitrogen) in the terrestrial ecosystems.

Abinash Agrawal

Dr. Agrawal is a Professor of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Wright State University. In the past, he served as Director of Graduate Programs, and Associate Chair, in Earth & Environmental Sciences dept., Wright State University.

Dr. Agrawal has been visiting professors/scholars at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio (2014); School of Earth Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (2013); Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (2004); Center for Higher Learning, NASA’s Stennis Space Center, MS (2003). Prior to his appointment at Wright State University in 1995, he worked as a post-doctoral Research Associate at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (1995), and a Fellow of the National Science and Engineering Research Council, Canada (1994-95).

Dr. Agrawal has presented invited talks at the numerous national and international academic institutions, which include Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, India (2017); Ministry of Human Resource and Development of the Gov’t of India (2016); Harbin Institute of Technology, State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resources and Environment, Harbin, P.R. China (2015); Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, India (2014); School of Earth Sciences, Ohio State University (2014), etc. In Spring 2016, Dr. Agrawal organized a symposium titled 'Advances in In-situ Pollutant Destruction by Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron & Other Engineered Nanoparticles' at the 251st American Chemical Society Annual Meeting in San Diego.

Jose Amador

Professor of Soil Science and Microbial Ecology in the Dept. of Natural Resources Science, University of Rhode Island.

The research of our lab spans various aspects of the ecology and microbiology of soil, water, and wastewater. We are interested in understanding the interplay among microorganisms, flora and fauna, and the physical environment, and how this affects the biogeochemical processes they carry out, as well as their fate. This knowledge can be used to address a variety of contemporary environmental problems, from optimizing soil-based wastewater treatment, to identifying the sources of bacterial contamination in surface waters, to improving soil quality and sustainable food production. We are also interested in science education, including novel pedagogical approaches to teaching soil science, teacher training, and experiential education.

Marc Amyot

Canada Research Chair in Global Change Ecotoxicology, professor of biological sciences, Université de Montréal. Director of NSERC CREATE network Mine of Knowledge.

Alexandre Anesio

Alexandre Magno Anesio is a Professor of Biogeochemistry in the School of Geographical Sciences at the University of Bristol. He is also the Director for the Bristol Glaciology Centre. Anesio gained his PhD in 2000 from Sweden and came to the UK as a Marie Curie postdoctoral fellow in 2003. His research interests are broad, and he combines concepts from Geography, Biology and Chemistry to understand the carbon and nutrient cycle in the cryosphere. In the past 14 years, Anesio has conducted fieldwork in the Arctic, including on the Greenland Ice Sheet and Greenland glaciers (e.g., Kangerlussuaq, Zackenberg, Tassilaq) to demonstrate the impact of microbial processes on a) albedo reduction, b) production, accumulation and export of organic carbon and nutrients to downstream ecosystems and c) the diversity and biogeochemical cycles of subglacial environments. He has secured grants as PI from a variety of sources which includes the UK Research Council (NERC), UK Charities (e.g., Leverhulme Trust, Nuffield Foundation) and the EU (Marie Curie Fellowship and Innovative Training Network). Anesio was elected the 2016 Distinguished Lecturer by the European Geochemistry Association.

Avelino F Arellano

Associate Professor of Data Assimilation and Atmospheric Chemistry at the Department of Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Arizona (UA). He is also a faculty member of the following UA Graduate Interdisciplinary Programs (GIDP): Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis and Applied Mathematics.

His research focuses on investigating human fingerprints in the atmosphere. His research combines numerical models and observations to study atmospheric constituents, especially those emitted from combustion-related activities, and how these constituents affect air quality, weather, climate, and our environment.

Teri Balser

Professor Teri Balser is Dean of Teaching and Learning for the Faculty of Science and Engineering at Curtin University, where she came after having been Dean of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the University of Florida. She received a Ph.D. in soil microbiology came from the University of California at Berkeley, and she completed postdoctoral research in ecosystem ecology at Stanford University. She is a Fellow of the Soil Science Society of America, and was recently named to the Australian Research Council College of Experts.

Her research centers on understanding microbial community-level ecophysiological responses to stress, disturbance, and change, and the consequences of these for ecosystem functioning. She has worked in countries worldwide studying restoration, carbon sequestration, invasive species, biodiversity, and land use/land cover.

In addition to international recognition as an accomplished research scholar, Dr. Balser is widely known in higher education as a change agent and leader in Science, Technology Engineering and Math education (STEM). She is a co-founder of the Society for Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER), a National Vision and Change Fellow with the Partnership for Undergraduate Life Sciences Education (PULSE), and was a Fulbright-Nehru Distinguished Chair to India in 2015 to help build capacity at the national level for pedagogically advanced and responsive STEM education.

Jesse O Bash

A Research Physical Scientist, in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory, Computational Exposure Division; Past Physical Scientist in U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Air Resources Laboratory, Atmospheric Sciences Modeling Division.

Research is focused on developing and expanding the capabilities of current air-quality and biogeochemical models to better represent the nitrogen cycle, mercury cycle and atmospheric mercury chemistry, and the coupling of ecosystem and air-quality models.

Nathan Basiliko

Nathan Basiliko is a faculty member and Canada Research Chair in Environmental Microbiology at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario. His group combines new molecular tools with more classical approaches in ecosystem sciences and soil microbiology to study how forest and wetland soil biota respond to resource management, climate change, and other stressors in the Great Lakes St. Lawrence (northern temperate hardwood) and Boreal Forest regions. Dr. Basiliko also explores general controls on microbial diversity in soils, links between diversity and activity, and how different soil microbial communities transform plant tissues into soil organic matter and then subsequently decompose this organic matter to mineral products, including greenhouse gases. Prior to joining Laurentian in 2013, he was a faculty member at the University of Toronto and a post-doctoral fellow in Forest Sciences at the University of British Columbia. He completed his bachelors in Natural Resources at Cornell University and doctorate in Physical Geography at McGill University.

Michael Beman

The overarching goal of my research program is to develop a predictive understanding of microbial ecology and biogeochemistry in the ‘Anthropocene’ sea. My research sits at the interface of microbial ecology, biogeochemistry, and global change science, and I work worldwide in reefs and estuaries, marine lakes and mountain lakes, and the open ocean. I focus on the responses of microbial communities, and the processes mediated by these communities, to environmental change—including climate change, ocean acidification, and ocean deoxygenation.

I received a B.S. from Yale University and a Ph.D. from Stanford in Geological and Environmental Sciences; before joining the UC Merced faculty in 2009, where I was a postdoc in Marine Environmental Biology at USC, a lecturer at UCLA, and an Assistant Researcher at the University of Hawai’i. I am an Associate Professor and member of the Sierra Nevada Research Institute and the Environmental Systems and Quantitative and Systems Biology graduate groups.

Frank Berninger

I am a Biogeochemist and Ecologist working on large range of subjects. Current interest are changes in productivity and energy balance of forest ecosystems. the long term effects of disturbances on biogeochemistry as well as the effects of forestry on climate change.

Robert G. Björk

I am an ecologist with interest in the coupling between biodiversity and ecosystem processes. My research interests span from plant community dynamics to greenhouse gas fluxes, and particularly on the herbivory-plant-soil(-snow) interactions and linkages in the rhizosphere between ecosystem structure (including plants, mycorrhizal fungi and soil microbes) and functioning. A main objective of my work is to increase our understanding of how terrestrial ecosystems (mostly tundra) will respond to, and affect, climate change.