Advisory Board and Editors Freshwater Biology

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Marc Amyot

Canada Research Chair in Global Change Ecotoxicology, professor of biological sciences, Université de Montréal. Director of NSERC CREATE network Mine of Knowledge.

Alexandre Anesio

Alexandre Magno Anesio is a Professor of Biogeochemistry in the School of Geographical Sciences at the University of Bristol. He is also the Director for the Bristol Glaciology Centre. Anesio gained his PhD in 2000 from Sweden and came to the UK as a Marie Curie postdoctoral fellow in 2003. His research interests are broad, and he combines concepts from Geography, Biology and Chemistry to understand the carbon and nutrient cycle in the cryosphere. In the past 14 years, Anesio has conducted fieldwork in the Arctic, including on the Greenland Ice Sheet and Greenland glaciers (e.g., Kangerlussuaq, Zackenberg, Tassilaq) to demonstrate the impact of microbial processes on a) albedo reduction, b) production, accumulation and export of organic carbon and nutrients to downstream ecosystems and c) the diversity and biogeochemical cycles of subglacial environments. He has secured grants as PI from a variety of sources which includes the UK Research Council (NERC), UK Charities (e.g., Leverhulme Trust, Nuffield Foundation) and the EU (Marie Curie Fellowship and Innovative Training Network). Anesio was elected the 2016 Distinguished Lecturer by the European Geochemistry Association.

Robert Arlinghaus

Professor of Integrative Fisheries Management at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries. Robert works on fisheries as coupled social-ecological systems and recreational fisheries sustainability. He has received several awards, including the Award of Excellence in Fisheries Management by the American Fisheries Society, the Medal by The Fisheries Society of the British Isles and the Cultura Award by the Alfred-Töpfer-Foundation. Robert is heavily engaged in public outreach and transdisciplinary studies on emergent topics in fisheries sciences.

Donald J Baird

Research Scientist in the Water Science & Technology Directorate of Environment and Climate Change Canada, Visiting Research Professor in the Biology Department at the University of New Brunswick and Science Director of the Canadian Rivers Institute.

His primary research interests include the study of watershed patterns in aquatic biodiversity and the influence of landscape stressors on resident biota. Current research concerns freshwater invertebrates, with dragonflies as a particular focus. He has previously worked on a variety of taxa groups from flatworms to fish, and in a variety of habitats from wetlands, lakes and rivers to coastal marine systems.

Michael Beman

The overarching goal of my research program is to develop a predictive understanding of microbial ecology and biogeochemistry in the ‘Anthropocene’ sea. My research sits at the interface of microbial ecology, biogeochemistry, and global change science, and I work worldwide in reefs and estuaries, marine lakes and mountain lakes, and the open ocean. I focus on the responses of microbial communities, and the processes mediated by these communities, to environmental change—including climate change, ocean acidification, and ocean deoxygenation.

I received a B.S. from Yale University and a Ph.D. from Stanford in Geological and Environmental Sciences; before joining the UC Merced faculty in 2009, where I was a postdoc in Marine Environmental Biology at USC, a lecturer at UCLA, and an Assistant Researcher at the University of Hawai’i. I am an Associate Professor and member of the Sierra Nevada Research Institute and the Environmental Systems and Quantitative and Systems Biology graduate groups.

John A Berges

Professor in Biological Sciences and Freshwater Sciences. PhD Biological Oceanography, U. British Columbia. Postdoctoral work, Brookhaven National Laboratory. Fellow of the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography. Research interests include marine and freshwater phytoplankton and zooplankton ecophysiology and biochemistry, including molecular (e.g. evolution of cell death proteases) and biomathematical (e.g. agent-based modelling) approaches.

Mario Brauns

Researcher at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ and head of the food web ecology lab.

Research interests include: Lotic ecosystem processes, freshwater food webs, benthic secondary production, functional assessment, stable isotopes, invasive species.

Kirsten S. Christoffersen

Professor in Arctic Freshwater biology at University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and The University Centre in Svalbard, Norway. Previously Center leader of Polar Science Center, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Copenhagen (2009-14), member of the international steering committee for CAFF/CBMP-freshwater Program (2011-present), coordinator for the Danish/Greenland expert group in CBMP-freshwater (2012-present), board member of the Arctic Station Council, University of Copenhagen, Greenland (2005-present), member of Scientific Board for Austrian Academy of Sciences (2008-2012), member of the Danish Research Council (2007-2013), member of accreditation boards for Norwegian education institutions (2006 and 2007), Ad hoc member of evaluation boards for the Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish Research Councils (1998-present),

Mark John Costello

B.Sc. (NUI Galway); Ph.D. 1987 (NUI Cork). Involved in World Register of Marine Species, International Association for Biological Oceanography, Global Biodiversity Information Facility, Ocean Biogeographic Information System, Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network, Species 2000.

Keith A Crandall

Keith A. Crandall, PhD is the founding Director of the Computational Biology Institute at George Washington University. Professor Crandall studies the computational biology, population genetics, and bioinformatics, developing and testing of Big Data methods DNA sequence analysis. He applies such methods to the study of the evolution of both infectious diseases (especially HIV) and crustaceans (especially crayfish). Professor Crandall has published over 260 peer reviewed publications, as well as three books. He has been a Fulbright Visiting Scholar to Oxford University and an Allen Wilson Centre Sabbatical Fellow at the University of Auckland. Professor Crandall has received a number of awards for research and teaching, including the American Naturalist Society Young Investigator Award, an NSF CAREER Award, a PhRMA Foundation Faculty Development Award in Bioinformatics, Honors Professor of the Year award at Brigham Young University, ISI Highly Cited Researcher, and the Edward O. Wilson Naturalist Award. He was also recently elected a Fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and a Fellow of the Linnean Society of London. Professor Crandall earned his BA degree from Kalamazoo College in Biology and Mathematics, an MA degree from Washington University in Statistics, and a PhD from Washington University School of Medicine in Biology and Biomedical Sciences. He also served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Puyo, Ecuador.

Valery E Forbes

Valery Forbes is Dean of the College of Biological Sciences at the University of Minnesota and Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior. From 2011-2015 she was Director of the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. From 1989-2010, she lived and worked in Denmark, most recently as the Founding Chair of the Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change and Professor of Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology at Roskilde University. Dr. Forbes received her Bachelor’s Degree (Biology & Geology) from the State University of New York at Binghamton in 1983, her M.Sc. (Marine Environmental Science) from SUNY-Stony Brook in 1984, and her Ph.D. (Coastal Oceanography), also from SUNY- Stony Brook in 1988. Specific research topics include population ecology and modeling, fate and effects of toxic chemicals in sediments, and ecological risk assessment.

Tessa B Francis

Tessa Francis is the Lead Ecosystem Ecologist at the Puget Sound Institute, and the Managing Director of the Ocean Modeling Forum. Tessa holds a B.A. in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley; a B.S. in Wildlife Science from the University of Washington; and a Ph.D. in Zoology and Urban Ecology from the University of Washington.