Advisory Board and Editors Climate Change Biology

PeerJ Factsheet
A one-page facts and stats PDF, to help when considering journal options with your co-authors.

Samuel Abiven

I am group leader at the university of Zurich, department of geography. My research and teaching deal with biogeochemical cycles (mainly carbon and nitrogen) in the terrestrial ecosystems.

Susana Agusti

Dr. Susana Agusti is Professor of Marine Science at KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology) at the Red Sea Research Center, and Adjunct Professor at the University of Tromsø (Norway).

She holds Bachelors and Ph.D. degrees from the Autonomous University of Madrid.
Formerly she was Research Professor with the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), and Professorial Fellow with the UWA Oceans Institute and the School of Plant Biology at the University of Western Australia (Australia).

Marc Amyot

Canada Research Chair in Global Change Ecotoxicology, professor of biological sciences, Université de Montréal. Director of NSERC CREATE network Mine of Knowledge.

Nigel R. Andrew

My current research interests focus on the impacts that climate change will have on insect behaviour, ecology and physiology; insect community structure along environmental gradients; and insect-plant interactions.
I am currently Managing Editor of Austral Ecology.

Teri Balser

Professor Teri Balser is Dean of Teaching and Learning for the Faculty of Science and Engineering at Curtin University, where she came after having been Dean of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the University of Florida. She received a Ph.D. in soil microbiology came from the University of California at Berkeley, and she completed postdoctoral research in ecosystem ecology at Stanford University. She is a Fellow of the Soil Science Society of America, and was recently named to the Australian Research Council College of Experts.

Her research centers on understanding microbial community-level ecophysiological responses to stress, disturbance, and change, and the consequences of these for ecosystem functioning. She has worked in countries worldwide studying restoration, carbon sequestration, invasive species, biodiversity, and land use/land cover.

In addition to international recognition as an accomplished research scholar, Dr. Balser is widely known in higher education as a change agent and leader in Science, Technology Engineering and Math education (STEM). She is a co-founder of the Society for Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER), a National Vision and Change Fellow with the Partnership for Undergraduate Life Sciences Education (PULSE), and was a Fulbright-Nehru Distinguished Chair to India in 2015 to help build capacity at the national level for pedagogically advanced and responsive STEM education.

Anastazia T Banaszak

Research Professor at the Unidad Académica de Sistemas Arrecifales (Reef Systems Academic Unit) a campus of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México located in Puerto Morelos in the Mexican Caribbean. Her undergraduate education was at James Cook University, Townsville, Australia followed by her graduate degree at the University of California at Santa Barbara, USA and a postdoctoral appointment at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Maryland, USA.

Her research interests include the photobiology of phytoplankton, corals and coral reef dwelling-organisms as well as coral reproductive biology and ecology. Most recently, she has become involved in research on best practices for culturing coral species for use in restoration projects.

She is a topic editor for Coral Reefs, council member of the International Society for Reef Studies and serves on the scientific advisory boards for the Healthy Reefs Initiative and SECORE International and is on the steering committees of the Coral Restoration Consortium and the Meso-American Reef Restoration Group.

Antonio M Baptista

Professor, Division of Environmental and Biomolecular Systems and Director, Center for Coastal Margin Observation & Prediction, both at the School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University.

Research interests are in understanding how coastal margins function under the complex influence of rivers, ocean, climate and humans – and how to integrate such understanding in broad-range societal decisions on sustainable development.

Gerrit T.S. Beemster

Professor of Biology at the University of Antwerp. Member of the Flemish Science Foundation review board. Editor of the journals Journal of Plant Research, Frontiers in Plant Science and PLOS ONE

Carl Beierkuhnlein

Studies in Geoecology, PhD on the Ecology of Forest Springs, Habilitation on Biodiversity Patterns. Prof. of Landscape Ecology, Univ. or Rostock, 1999-2001, Prof. of Biogeography, University of Bayreuth, since 2001.

Research Fields: Ecological Effects of Climate Change, Small Catchments and Discharge of Compounts to Springs and Rivers, Island Biogeography, Vector-Borne Diseases. Expertise in Field Studies, Experiments and Modelling.

Michael Beman

The overarching goal of my research program is to develop a predictive understanding of microbial ecology and biogeochemistry in the ‘Anthropocene’ sea. My research sits at the interface of microbial ecology, biogeochemistry, and global change science, and I work worldwide in reefs and estuaries, marine lakes and mountain lakes, and the open ocean. I focus on the responses of microbial communities, and the processes mediated by these communities, to environmental change—including climate change, ocean acidification, and ocean deoxygenation.

I received a B.S. from Yale University and a Ph.D. from Stanford in Geological and Environmental Sciences; before joining the UC Merced faculty in 2009, where I was a postdoc in Marine Environmental Biology at USC, a lecturer at UCLA, and an Assistant Researcher at the University of Hawai’i. I am an Associate Professor and member of the Sierra Nevada Research Institute and the Environmental Systems and Quantitative and Systems Biology graduate groups.

Frank Berninger

I am a Biogeochemist and Ecologist working on large range of subjects. Current interest are changes in productivity and energy balance of forest ecosystems. the long term effects of disturbances on biogeochemistry as well as the effects of forestry on climate change.

Robert G. Björk

I am an ecologist with interest in the coupling between biodiversity and ecosystem processes. My research interests span from plant community dynamics to greenhouse gas fluxes, and particularly on the herbivory-plant-soil(-snow) interactions and linkages in the rhizosphere between ecosystem structure (including plants, mycorrhizal fungi and soil microbes) and functioning. A main objective of my work is to increase our understanding of how terrestrial ecosystems (mostly tundra) will respond to, and affect, climate change.