Academic Editors

The following people constitute the Editorial Board of Academic Editors for PeerJ. These active academics are the Editors who seek peer reviewers, evaluate their responses, and make editorial decisions on each submission to the journal. Learn more about becoming an Editor.

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I told my colleagues that PeerJ is a journal where they need to publish if they want their paper to be published quickly and with the strict peer review expected from a good journal.
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Matthew PG Barnett

I'm currently a Senior Research Scientist in the Food Nutrition & Health Team, AgResearch Limited, one of New Zealand's Crown Research Institutes (CRIs). I'm based at the University of Auckland's Liggins Institute, being involved in several projects investigating the importance of nutrition for health throughout life. The primary focus of these projects is intestinal health, but I'm also interested other aspects of human health, including cognition and mobility.
I graduated from The University of Auckland in May 2005 with a PhD in Biological Sciences. My thesis research focused on the importance of a mother’s diet during gestation and lactation on the risk of type-2 diabetes in her offspring. Since 2001 I've worked for AgResearch in a range of roles (including Research Associate, FRST Postdoctoral Fellow, and Research Scientist) and on a variety of topics. I was part of the Nutrigenomics New Zealand collaboration from 2004-2014, working on understanding how our diet and genome interact to influence health with a particular focus on intestinal function.
I was the Section Editor (Nutrigenomics) for the European Journal of Nutrition from 2014 to 2019.

Anthony S. Barnhart

Anthony “Tony” Barnhart received his Ph.D. in Cognitive Science from Arizona State University in 2013, where he began his graduate career with the intention of being a language researcher. To this end, he has published research examining the processes underlying handwritten word perception, a domain that has been largely ignored by psychologists. However, Tony is also a part-time professional magician with over 20 years of performing experience. Magicians are informal cognitive scientists with their own hypotheses about the mind. Tony empirically tests these novel hypotheses and introduces magical methodologies into the laboratory to increase the ecological validity of experimental studies of attention and perception.

Simon Baron-Cohen

Simon Baron-Cohen is Professor of Developmental Psychopathology, University of Cambridge and Fellow at Trinity College, Cambridge. He is Director, Autism Research Centre (ARC) in Cambridge. He has a degree in Human Sciences from New College, Oxford, a PhD in Psychology from UCL, and an M.Phil in Clinical Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College, London, and he held lectureships in these departments. He is author of Mindblindness, The Essential Difference, Prenatal Testosterone in Mind, and Zero Degrees of Empathy. He has edited scholarly anthologies including Understanding Other Minds, Synaesthesia, and The Maladapted Mind. He has written books for parents and teachers including Autism and Asperger Syndrome: The Facts, and Teaching Children with Autism to Mindread. He has celebrated autism in An Exact Mind. He is author of the DVDs Mind Reading and The Transporters, to help children with autism learn emotion recognition, both nominated for BAFTA awards. He is author of >450 scientific articles. He has supervised 32 PhD students.

Louise Barrett

Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Cognition, Evolution and Behaviour; Executive Editor, Animal Behaviour 2006-2011; Editor, Behavioral Ecology, Evolutionary Human Sciences, Advances in the Study of Animal Behaviour; Past Member of Council, Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

Barbara Bartolini

I have a degree in Biological Sciences with specialization in biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of Pavia, Italy, where I got also my Ph.D. degree in biochemistry with a thesis on fibrillar collagens, proteoglycans, and integrins and their role in the extracellular matrix organization.

My main scientific interest is glycobiology, as I have worked on hyaluronan, dermatan sulfate and heparan sulfate, oxidation specific epitopes and atherosclerosis.
I have also a strong background in cell biology and especially in cell migration and motility.

Jesse O Bash

A Research Physical Scientist, in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory, Computational Exposure Division; Past Physical Scientist in U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Air Resources Laboratory, Atmospheric Sciences Modeling Division.

Research is focused on developing and expanding the capabilities of current air-quality and biogeochemical models to better represent the nitrogen cycle, mercury cycle and atmospheric mercury chemistry, and the coupling of ecosystem and air-quality models.

Ugo Bastolla

I got my PhD in Physics at Rome University, working with Luca Peliti and Giorgio Parisi on biologically inspired problems: evolutionary models and Boolean networks. Since then, I have always been interested in computational biology: Protein folding, Stability and population biology constraints in protein evolution, Conformation changes in proteins, Structural evolution of proteins, Theoretical ecology, Ecological interactions among microorganisms.

Amanda E Bates

The global redistribution of species is leading to large-scale community change. Gaining a process-based understanding for what factors create species and community resilience under environmental variability is an important research objective for our time. My research aims to address this theme by linking physiological thresholds of organisms to the environment they experience to quantify changes in species distributions, the outcome of species interactions, and community patterns. My approach is to link spatial and temporal trends in abiotic variables at biologically relevant scales using standardized experimental protocols, complementary laboratory and field approaches, meta-analytic approaches, and modern statistical tools.

Jacqueline Batley

Professor in the School of Biological Sciences, University of Western Australia. I hold an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship. Research interests include plant-pathogen interactions, crop genetics and genomics, genome sequencing, Brassicas, structural variation, diversity genomics, methylation

Renu Batra-Safferling

Group Leader, Structural Biochemistry in Institute of Complex Systems (ICS-6) in Research Centre Juelich, Germany. Postdoctoral scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg, Germany (1996-1999) and at Columbia University, New York, USA (1999-2002). Primary focus of my research is to understand the structure-function relationships of soluble and membrane proteins of biological importance.

Anaïs Baudot

I'm a Systems Biologist with a background in Biology, Genetics and Bioinformatics. I hold a PhD from the Aix-Marseille University. After a Post-Doc in the CNIO (Madrid, Spain), I got a CNRS Researcher position in 2010. I've working since then in the Marseille Institute of Mathematics (CNRS-AMU). I'm interested in -omics studies (interactomes), Networks (partitioning, boolean modelling), and questions related to human diseases, in particular complex diseases, cancers and comorbidities.

Eric B Bauman

Dr. Eric B. Bauman is an award-winning educational designer and author, and proven researcher who promotes the integration of innovative educational technology for clinical teaching and learning within the health sciences. He is best known for his analysis and synthesis of contemporary pedagogy that supports the integration simulation and game-based teaching and learning across the health sciences. Dr. Bauman's portfolio has been widely published and disseminated through peer reviewed journals, textbooks and conference proceedings. He has presented and/or facilitated well over 100 venues, including the White House and National Academies of Science.