Advisory Board and Editors Neuroscience

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I told my colleagues that PeerJ is a journal where they need to publish if they want their paper to be published quickly and with the strict peer review expected from a good journal.
Sohath Vanegas,
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Jafri M. Abdullah

Professor of Neurosciences; MD (USM), DSCN (Belgium), PhD (Univ Ghent), Director Brain & Behaviour Cluster and Previous Director of the Center for Neuroscience Services & Research (P3Neuro), Universiti Sains Malaysia. Fellow of the Academy of Sciences, Malaysia, American College of Surgeons,International College of Surgeons(USA) as well as the Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh, Recipient of the prestigious National Malaysian Young Scientist Award & Top Research Scientist award (Academy Science Malaysia). I am an Academic Neurosurgeon and a Neuroscientist .I am the Founding Director of the Center for Neurosciences Sevices and Research( P3 Neuro ) and the Brain Behaviour Cluster,Universiti Sains Malaysia.I am the Founding Head of the Department of Neurosciences,School of Medical Sciences,Universiti Sains Malaysia.
I have helped to establish 9 Postgraduate Courses in Neurology,Neurosurgery,Neurosciences,Cognitive Neurosciences,Clinical Psychology and Clinical Neuropsychology in Universiti Sains Malaysia ( https://www.topuniversities.com/universities/universiti-sains-malaysia-usm/undergrad )

Daniel Adesse

Has a bachelor's degree in Biological Sciences from the Universidade Santa Úrsula (2004), a Master's degree (2007) and PhD (2010) in Cellular and Molecular Biology from Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, with two periods as visiting scientist at the Departments of Pathology and Neuroscience of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Yeshiva University, New York, NY) With a post-doctoral degree from the Biophysics Institute (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro), under supervision of Prof. Rafael Linden (2010-2013).

Currently is Associate Researcher at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, where is investigating mechanisms of changes in embryonic development during congenital toxoplasmosis, with focus on the skeletal muscle system and Central Nervous System. In a model of mouse infection with Toxoplasma gondii investigates the effect that such infection causes to cerebral microcirculation and in the Blood-Brain Barrier, as a result of neuroinflammation. Has experience in Morphology, acting on the following subjects: parasite-host cell interaction, primary cell culture, cellular junctions, 2D and 3D cell culture models, Confocal and Transmission Electron Microscopy.

Arti Ahluwalia

Associate Prof. of Bioengineering, University of Pisa, Head of In-Vitro Models Group and NanoBioscopy Lab at the National Council of Research Institute of Clinical Physiology (CNR-IFC). Also involved in capacity building in the field of Biomedical Engineering, in association with UNECA and FABLAB Pisa .Author of over 100 peer-reviewed publications and of several patents on microfabrication and on bioreactors, co-founder of 2 high-tech companies.

Dawn N Albertson

Ph.D. in Cellular & Clinical Neurobiology from Wayne State University School of Medicine. Associate Professor of Psychology at Minnesota State University, Mankato.

Zekiye Sultan Altun

The Zekiye Altun Professor of Biochemistry and Basic Oncology, Dokuz Eylul University. Member of the Cell Death Research Society of Turkey and Basic Oncology Society.

Ignacio Arganda-Carreras

Ignacio Arganda-Carreras (Madrid, 1980) is a European PhD in Computer Engineering and Telecommunications by the Autonomous University of Madrid and holds a BSc in Computer Engineering from the same university. He took postdoctoral studies at the department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 2009 to 2013 and at the Jean-Pierre Bourgin Institute of the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Versailles, from 2013 to 2015.

During his doctorate studies he carried out research stays at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley (California, 2002-2004), at the Centre for Machine Perception of the Technical University of Prague (2005) and at the Applied Medical Research Centre of the University of Navarra in Pamplona (2006). He has worked as a consultant for the Max Planck Institute of Cellular Biology and Genetics in Dresden (2009) and for the Institute of Neuroinformatics in Zurich (2009).

Since September 2015 he is an Ikerbasque Research Fellow at the Department of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence of the University of the Basque Country.

Bernard J Baars

Bernard J. Baars (born 1946, Amsterdam) is a former Senior Fellow in Theoretical Neurobiology at The Neurosciences Institute in La Jolla, CA., directed by the late Gerald M. Edelman. Baars is currently an Affiliated Fellow.

He is best known as the originator of Global Workspace Theory (GWT), an empirical theory of human cognition and consciousness, developed with Stan Franklin as a computational architecture. A number of neuroscience groups in the US and Europe are pursuing this approach, including Stanislas Dehaene in Paris and Nikos Logothetis at the Max Planck Institute, Tuebingen. "Consciousness science" is now an established field, with a large brain and psychological literature.

In 2013, a major update called Dynamic Global Workspace Theory (D-GWT) appeared. (Baars, Franklin & Ramsoy, 2013, Frontiers). This work proceeds.

Baars served as a professor of psychology at the State University of New York, Stony Brook, where he studied laboratory-evoked human errors. The same factors plausibly cause spontaneous errors as well, a significant practical as well as scientific problem. Involuntary errors are directly relevant to the basic question of voluntary control.

Baars co-founded the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness, and the Elsevier journal Consciousness & Cognition, with William P. Banks.

Please see my 2015 article on Consciousness in Scholarpedia, summarizing the empirical evidence (which is often said not to exist... !).

Elena E Bagley

Dr Bagley is a Associate Professor in the Discipline of Pharmacology at the University of Sydney.

A/Prof Bagley completed a PhD at the University of Sydney in 2001. She was a C.J Martin Fellow from 2001 to 2006. During this time she was a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Professor Gary Westbrook at the Vollum Institute (Oregon, USA) and at the Pain Management Research Institute (University of Sydney).

Dr Bagley began developing her research laboratory at the Brain and Mind Institute (2010-2011) and then moved to Pharmacology in 2011.

Anthony S. Barnhart

Anthony “Tony” Barnhart received his Ph.D. in Cognitive Science from Arizona State University in 2013, where he began his graduate career with the intention of being a language researcher. To this end, he has published research examining the processes underlying handwritten word perception, a domain that has been largely ignored by psychologists. However, Tony is also a part-time professional magician with over 20 years of performing experience. Magicians are informal cognitive scientists with their own hypotheses about the mind. Tony empirically tests these novel hypotheses and introduces magical methodologies into the laboratory to increase the ecological validity of experimental studies of attention and perception.

Simon Baron-Cohen

Simon Baron-Cohen is Professor of Developmental Psychopathology, University of Cambridge and Fellow at Trinity College, Cambridge. He is Director, Autism Research Centre (ARC) in Cambridge. He has a degree in Human Sciences from New College, Oxford, a PhD in Psychology from UCL, and an M.Phil in Clinical Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College, London, and he held lectureships in these departments. He is author of Mindblindness, The Essential Difference, Prenatal Testosterone in Mind, and Zero Degrees of Empathy. He has edited scholarly anthologies including Understanding Other Minds, Synaesthesia, and The Maladapted Mind. He has written books for parents and teachers including Autism and Asperger Syndrome: The Facts, and Teaching Children with Autism to Mindread. He has celebrated autism in An Exact Mind. He is author of the DVDs Mind Reading and The Transporters, to help children with autism learn emotion recognition, both nominated for BAFTA awards. He is author of >450 scientific articles. He has supervised 32 PhD students.

Cristina Becchio

Cristina is Associate Professor at the Psychology Department, University of Turin, and Senior Researcher at the Robotics, Brain and Cognitive Sciences Department, Italian Institute of Technology, Genova. After studying philosophy at the University of Turin, she joined a PhD Program in Cognitive Science in 2001. She became researcher at the University of Turin in 2006. She is interested in the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying motor cognition.

Matthew K Belmonte

Matthew Belmonte's research asks how domain-general cognitive capacities shape the developmental emergence of both social and non-social perception, cognition and action -- giving rise to individual differences therein and autistic disorders thereof. Applying both cognitive neuroimaging (EEG/ERP and fMRI) and behavioural methods, Belmonte enunciated the now widely accepted and supported theory of dysconnectivity within and between autistic neural and cognitive networks, in which differences of local neural network entropy perturb activity-dependent development of long-range network connectivity, impairing top-down integrative control and enhancing autonomous processing. A current clinical application of this work assays the effect of computer-assisted training of prerequisite motor skills on autistic social communicative ability, whilst work in basic science is exploring interactions of dimensional autistic traits, cognitive sex differences, individualistic versus collectivistic cultures, and situational manipulations of psychological distance and level of construal. Belmonte is the recipient of a 2009 Faculty Early Career Development Award from the US National Science Foundation, the 2010 Neil O'Connor Award from the British Psychological Society, and a 2011 Fulbright-Nehru Fellowship.