Academic Editors

The following people constitute the Editorial Board of Academic Editors for PeerJ Organic Chemistry. These active academics are the Editors who seek peer reviewers, evaluate their responses, and make editorial decisions on each submission to the journal. Learn more about becoming an Editor.

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Samuel Abiven

I am group leader at the university of Zurich, department of geography. My research and teaching deal with biogeochemical cycles (mainly carbon and nitrogen) in the terrestrial ecosystems.

Mateo Alajarin

Mateo Alajarin graduated in chemistry at the Universidad de Murcia, where he also received his PhD. After postdoctoral studies with Prof. Alan R. Katritzky at the University of Florida (USA) he returned to the Universidad de Murcia where he is currently Full Professor at its Department of Organic Chemistry. His research interests include ketenimines and related heterocumulenes, supramolecular chemistry, organophosphorus reagents, tandem processes promoted by H shifts, and other pericyclic and pseudopericyclic reactions.

Giovanna Bosica

Giovanna Bosica graduated cum laude from the University of Camerino, Italy, in 1993 with a Laurea degree, equivalent to M.Sc.(Hons), in Chemistry and obtained her Ph.D. degree in Chemical Sciences, in the field of organic synthesis, in 1997 from the same institution. In 1995 during her Ph.D. she spent a six months research period at the University of Nijmegen, the Netherlands, as an Erasmus Fellow.

In 1999 she was appointed Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry at the University of Camerino.
In October 2008 she moved to the University of Malta where she was appointed Associate Professor of Organic Chemistry in the Department of Chemistry and subsequently obtained the promotion to full Professor in March 2014. She lectures for different courses in the field of organic chemistry/synthesis and natural products.

She is member of the Royal Chemical Society (MRSC) since 2011 and of the American Chemical Society (ACS) since 2015. In March 2016 she has joined the European COST Association, participating at the COST Action CA15106, C-H Activation in Organic Synthesis (CHAOS), as a MC member from Malta [CA15106 MT].

Anna K. Croft

Associate Professor at University of Nottingham, specialising in biological chemistry, reaction mechanisms, and ionic liquids.
Senior Lecturer in Bio-Organic Chemistry at Bangor University until 2013.

Antonio EM Crotti

Prof. Antônio E. Miller Crotti is currently a Ph.D. professor at Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. His research has been focusing on the use of mass spectrometry for the investigation of gas-phase fragmentation reactions and dereplication of organic synthetic compounds and natural products, as well as for the identification of their in vitro and in vivo metabolites. Also, he is interested in the biological activities of organic synthetic compounds and essential oils, with emphasis on the insecticidal, antimicrobial and antiparasitic activities.

Jiang Cui

Dr. Cui is currently a postdoctoral researcher at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. His research is focused on the development of electrode materials for energy storage applications. He is also interested in applying first-principles calculations and in-situ TEM to study the thermodynamics and kinetics of battery materials.

Gamal A El-Hiti

Our research interests are primarily in the development of novel organic synthetic methods, especially ones that are “greener” than traditionally and synthesis of compounds with interesting properties. Particular current research projects involve use of zeolites and solid-supported reagents and catalysts to gain selectivity in organic reactions; lithiation reactions which we have used to devise novel heterocyclic ring syntheses and to introduce selectivity into aromatic and heterocyclic substitution reactions; heterocyclic chemistry; polymeric materials and design and synthesis of novel compounds with interesting chemiluminescent or other photoactive properties. The current research focuses on the chemistry of tear ferning which is a valuable tool in the detection of dryness of eye. We are investigating the dryness of the eye through evaluation of tear osmolarity using the TearLab system and various other techniques. Also, we are investigating the ocular tear film in diabetic and smoker subjects to test the correlation between dryness of the eye and diabetes disease and nicotine.

Carlos Fernández Marcos

Carlos F. Marcos holds a Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from the University of Santiago of Compostela, where he specialized in chemistry of heterocycles and total synthesis of natural products. He completed his training on the chemistry of the organometallic compounds at the University of Milan and at the Imperial College London, where he was awarded with a grant of the Human Capital and Mobility programme of the European Community.
In 1996 he joined the University of Extremadura, where he started a line of research on new sulfur heterocyclic materials, in collaboration with professors Charles Rees (Imperial College) and Tomás Torroba (UEx). From 2002, he leads a research group involved in the development of new synthetic methodologies. Throughout his career, he has supervised many research studies and has more than 50 publications indexed in frontline scientific journals. He has also made several stays as visiting professor in prestigious American and European research centres. From 2016, it holds a position as Full Professor at the University of Extremadura.
In recent years his research has focused in the chemistry of isocyanides, and especially their use to develop new tandem and multi-component processes. These synthetic strategies have proved to be a very advantageous approach to obtain organic materials with new properties, as well as compounds with biomedical interest.

Jeremiah J Gassensmith

Jeremiah's research focuses on several areas:

Development of stimuli responsive "smart" biomaterials
Creating new thermosalient molecular crystalline materials
Using metal-organic frameworks for native protein (i.e. drug) delivery
Supramolecular and macromolecular organic radical contrast agents as MRI sensors

Jorge Gonzalez Garcia

I obtained my PhD from the University of Valencia (Spain) focused on Supramolecular & Bioinorganic Chemistry, in which I worked in metalloenzymes mimetics and anion receptors. Upon completing my PhD in 2013, I performed several postdoctoral research positions in the University of Kansas (USA) and Institute Curie (France), in which I specialized in the development of drugs for non-canonical nucleic acids such as G-quadruplexes, triplexes or i-motifs. Then, I joined the Department of Chemistry at Imperial College London as Newton Fellow to develop new tools to target and visualize G-quadruplexes in cells. I continued my projects as IdEx Fellow in the European Institute of Chemistry and Biology in Bordeaux (France). Actually, I’ve started my team in the Institute of Molecular Science in the University of Valencia, where I’ve developed novel systems and methodologies to target non-canonical DNA structures and unravel their biological roles.

Christof M Jäger

Following my undergraduate studies of Molecular Science I received my PhD in Computational Chemistry from the University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Germany in 2010. I then worked as a Postdoc for the Cluster of Excellence Engineering Advanced Materials (EAM) until 2014, when I joined the Sustainable Process Technology (SPT)Research Group in in the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Nottingham.

My research activities all share the motivation to bring the power of computational chemistry to new chemical problems, to fundamentally understand properties and functions of organic (macro)molecules, to reveal hidden chemical questions and to promote solutions for chemical challenges.

My research experience includes Molecular Dynamics simulations, semi-empirical Molecular Orbital Theory, DFT and ab initio methods and force field development. Past projects involved multi-disciplinary research in the areas of bio-organic, colloid, and radical chemistry, molecular self-assembly, ion effects, and molecular electronics in organic electronic devices.

In Nottingham my research focuses on the development and application of efficient computational approaches for their use in enzyme driven biotechnology in order to discover sustainable routes for manufacturing fine chemicals and novel antibiotic drugs.