Academic Editors

The following people constitute the Editorial Board of Academic Editors for PeerJ. These active academics are the Editors who seek peer reviewers, evaluate their responses, and make editorial decisions on each submission to the journal. Learn more about becoming an Editor.

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Kerstin Bartscherer

Research Group Leader, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine. Research topics: cell-to-cell communication in development and regeneration of tissues, stem cell regulation, invertebrate model organisms.

Jesse O Bash

A Research Physical Scientist, in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory, Computational Exposure Division; Past Physical Scientist in U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Air Resources Laboratory, Atmospheric Sciences Modeling Division.

Research is focused on developing and expanding the capabilities of current air-quality and biogeochemical models to better represent the nitrogen cycle, mercury cycle and atmospheric mercury chemistry, and the coupling of ecosystem and air-quality models.

Nathan Basiliko

Nathan Basiliko is a faculty member and Canada Research Chair in Environmental Microbiology at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario. His group combines new molecular tools with more classical approaches in ecosystem sciences and soil microbiology to study how forest and wetland soil biota respond to resource management, climate change, and other stressors in the Great Lakes St. Lawrence (northern temperate hardwood) and Boreal Forest regions. Dr. Basiliko also explores general controls on microbial diversity in soils, links between diversity and activity, and how different soil microbial communities transform plant tissues into soil organic matter and then subsequently decompose this organic matter to mineral products, including greenhouse gases. Prior to joining Laurentian in 2013, he was a faculty member at the University of Toronto and a post-doctoral fellow in Forest Sciences at the University of British Columbia. He completed his bachelors in Natural Resources at Cornell University and doctorate in Physical Geography at McGill University.

Robert C. Bast

Vice President for Translational Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; Harry Carothers Wiess Distinguished University Chair for Cancer Research, Rosalind Franklin Award for Excellence in Ovarian Cancer Research, Ovarian Cancer National Alliance; Award for Excellence in Gynecologic Oncology, International Gynecologic Cancer Society.

Ugo Bastolla

I got my PhD in Physics at Rome University, working with Luca Peliti and Giorgio Parisi on biologically inspired problems: evolutionary models and Boolean networks. Since then, I have always been interested in computational biology: Protein folding, Stability and population biology constraints in protein evolution, Conformation changes in proteins, Structural evolution of proteins, Theoretical ecology, Ecological interactions among microorganisms.

Richard M. Bateman

Visiting Professor, University of Reading/Royal Botanic Gardens Kew. Formerly Head, Dept. of Botany, Natural History Museum; Director of Science, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh; Head of Policy, Biosciences Federation. President, UK Hardy Orchid Society; Previously President, Systematics Association, Vice-President, European Society for Evolutionary-Developmental Genetics, Linnean Society of London, Botanical Society of the British Isles. Co-founder/editorial board member of six journals.

Amanda E Bates

The global redistribution of species is leading to large-scale community change. Gaining a process-based understanding for what factors create species and community resilience under environmental variability is an important research objective for our time. My research aims to address this theme by linking physiological thresholds of organisms to the environment they experience to quantify changes in species distributions, the outcome of species interactions, and community patterns. My approach is to link spatial and temporal trends in abiotic variables at biologically relevant scales using standardized experimental protocols, complementary laboratory and field approaches, meta-analytic approaches, and modern statistical tools.

Jacqueline Batley

Professor in the School of Biological Sciences, University of Western Australia. I hold an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship. Research interests include plant-pathogen interactions, crop genetics and genomics, genome sequencing, Brassicas, structural variation, diversity genomics, methylation

Renu Batra-Safferling

Group Leader, Structural Biochemistry in Institute of Complex Systems (ICS-6) in Research Centre Juelich, Germany. Postdoctoral scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg, Germany (1996-1999) and at Columbia University, New York, USA (1999-2002). Primary focus of my research is to understand the structure-function relationships of soluble and membrane proteins of biological importance.

John J Battles

John J. Battles is a field scientist engaged in long-term research of temperate forest ecosystems. His goal is to understand how and why forests change. Towards this end, his research seeks to understand the dynamic response of forest communities to disturbances and perturbations such as air pollution, invasive species, forest management, extreme drought, and fire. His recent work has focused on understanding the interactions among disturbances in order to assess their potential to reshape forest community structure and function.

Anaïs Baudot

I'm a Systems Biologist with a background in Biology, Genetics and Bioinformatics. I hold a PhD from the Aix-Marseille University. After a Post-Doc in the CNIO (Madrid, Spain), I got a CNRS Researcher position in 2010. I've working since then in the Marseille Institute of Mathematics (CNRS-AMU). I'm interested in -omics studies (interactomes), Networks (partitioning, boolean modelling), and questions related to human diseases, in particular complex diseases, cancers and comorbidities.

Isabel Bäurle

Isabel Bäurle is an Assistant Professor at the University of Potsdam, Germany. Her current interests range from transcriptional memory in response to environmental stress to transposon and RNA silencing. Having previously worked on plant stem cells and flowering time, she has a background in plant developmental genetics, molecular biology and epigenetics.

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