Advisory Board and Editors Cognitive Disorders

Journal Factsheet
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I told my colleagues that PeerJ is a journal where they need to publish if they want their paper to be published quickly and with the strict peer review expected from a good journal.
Sohath Vanegas,
PeerJ Author
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Jyrki Ahveninen

Dr. Jyrki Ahveninen is Associate Professor of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology. His work focuses on neuroimaging of human auditory system, auditory working memory and higher-order auditory cognition using techniques including fMRI, MEG/EEG and TMS/EEG.

André Aleman

Prof. André Aleman studied psychology (neuropsychology and psychophysiology) at Utrecht University, where his research was focused on understanding the cognitive basis of hallucinations. He received his PhD cum laude in 2001. In 2006, Aleman was appointed Professor of Cognitive Neuropsychiatry at the University Medical Centre Groningen. Currently, he is Director of the Cognitive Neuroscience Center of the Department of Biomedical Sciences of Cells and Systems. In 2015, he was appointed Honorary Visiting Professor at the University of Shenzhen, China.

Prof. Aleman has published articles on memory impairment in schizophrenia, the neural basis of auditory verbal imagery, cognitive ageing, and insights into psychosis. His current research interests are related to the neural basis for cognitive and affective disorders in psychosis and depression with an emphasis on apathy, emotion regulation and treatment with non-invasive electromagnetic neurostimulation (TMS). He is also involved in studies into suicidality.

Bernard J Baars

Bernard J. Baars (born 1946, Amsterdam) is a former Senior Fellow in Theoretical Neurobiology at The Neurosciences Institute in La Jolla, CA., directed by the late Gerald M. Edelman. Baars is currently an Affiliated Fellow.

He is best known as the originator of Global Workspace Theory (GWT), an empirical theory of human cognition and consciousness, developed with Stan Franklin as a computational architecture. A number of neuroscience groups in the US and Europe are pursuing this approach, including Stanislas Dehaene in Paris and Nikos Logothetis at the Max Planck Institute, Tuebingen. "Consciousness science" is now an established field, with a large brain and psychological literature.

In 2013, a major update called Dynamic Global Workspace Theory (D-GWT) appeared. (Baars, Franklin & Ramsoy, 2013, Frontiers). This work proceeds.

Baars served as a professor of psychology at the State University of New York, Stony Brook, where he studied laboratory-evoked human errors. The same factors plausibly cause spontaneous errors as well, a significant practical as well as scientific problem. Involuntary errors are directly relevant to the basic question of voluntary control.

Baars co-founded the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness, and the Elsevier journal Consciousness & Cognition, with William P. Banks.

Please see my 2015 article on Consciousness in Scholarpedia, summarizing the empirical evidence (which is often said not to exist... !).

Nicholas A Badcock

Nicholas Badcock completed a MPsych/Phd in Applied Developmental Psychology with John Hogben and Jan Fletcher at the University of Western Australia in 2008. After a postdoc at The University of Oxford with Dorothy Bishop focussed on the lateralisation of language processing using functional transcranial Doppler ultrasonography, he returned to Australia, joining the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders at Macquarie University working with Genevieve McArthur on attention and reading. He is currently a Senior Lecturer at The University of Western Australia in Perth.

Oluwaseun Adebayo Bamodu

Dr. Oluwaseun Adebayo Bamodu is a Medical Research Fellow in the Department of Urology at Tapein Medical University - Shuang Ho Hospital. His research interests include: Precision Medicine, Breast Cancer, Cancer Research, Cancer Stem Cells, Immuno-oncology, Cancer Diagnostics, Therapeutics and Prognosis, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Functional Urology, and Genitourinary Malignancies.

Kevin J. Black

I am a movement disorders neuropsychiatrist. My research is primarily focused on neuroimaging and dopamine, especially in people with Tourette syndrome and Parkinson disease. I have also developed methods for structural imaging volumetry, analysis of brain images in nonhuman species, pharmacological fMRI (phMRI), and statistical analysis of anatomy-function relationships in deep brain stimulation (DBS).

Mark Boyes

Associate Professor and NHMRC Emerging Leadership Fellow in the School of Psychology, Curtin University.

Interests span health, developmental, and clinical psychology, with the overarching aim of understanding how both individual difference and social/community variables are related to psychological, social, and educational outcomes across the life-span. I am particularly interested in individual differences in cognitive and self-regulatory processes (such as appraisal, coping, and emotion regulation) and their potential links with emotional vulnerability.

Caroline Brennan

I did my PhD at King's College London in the Lab of Prof J.M. Littleton working on adaptive mechanisms underlying drug dependence. I demonstrated adaptive changes in the number of DHP sensitive VOCC following chronic exposure to central depressant drugs and showed that these changes were associated with genetic vulnerability to drug dependence.

I undertook post-doc training at the Clinical Research Centre Harrow, UK before joining the laboratory of Prof Nigel Holder at The Randall Institute, KCL and moving with him to UCL in 1998. Whilst at KCL and UCL I used zebrafish as a genetic model system for analysis of mechanisms underlying development.

Since 2000, I have been a Lecturer in Molecular Genetics in the School of Biological Sciences QMUL. Our work combines the two areas of my expertise: Molecular mechanisms underlying drug dependence and zebrafish as a developmental genetic model system. We have developed behavioural assays of drug seeking, compulsive drug seeking and relapse in zebrafish and are establishing lines of fish in which to explore the genetics contributing to these behaviours.

Emiliano Brunamonti

I am Associate Professor at the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology of SAPIENZA, University of Rome, since 2019. After graduating in Experimental Psychology at SAPIENZA, University of Rome, I obtained a PhD in Behavioral Neurophysiology at the same University. From 2005 to 2010 I worked at the Department of Physiology of Queen's University, Kingston (ON), Canada and the Institut Universitari de Audiovisual, University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Espana, focusing my research on the study of the neuronal correlate of motor decision in cortical brain areas. Since 2011 I have been working at the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology of SAPIENZA, University of Rome, focusing my research on the study of the neuronal correlates of inferential reasoning in both humans and monkeys.

Nathan Caruana

I am I am a cognitive neuroscientist within the Department of Cognitive Science at Macquarie University. I use virtual reality, eye tracking, motion capture and neurophysiology measures to study the cognitive and neural mechanisms of social perception, joint attention, and non-verbal social coordination - in typical development, autism and schizophrenia. In this work, I am specifically focused on developing interactive methods which balance ecological validity, experimental control and objectivity in our measurement of social attention, behaviour and corresponding neural processes.

Relating to this work, I also study how humans perceive and interact with social artificial agents (e.g., virtual avatars and physical robots). I am specifically interested in examining how our beliefs and expectations shape our experiences with artificial agents to inform how they can be optimally designed and positioned to fulfil their intended purpose.

Anissa Daliry

Dr. Anissa Daliry is a biologist at the Federal College of Pernambuco (UFPE) and holds a master's degree and a PhD in cellular and molecular biology from FIOCRUZ and a postdoctoral degree from Biophysics/UFRJ. Dr. Anissa is a permanent professor of Cell and Molecular Biology program, IOC/FIOCRUZ (level 7/ CAPES) and young scientist of our state/FAPERJ (2021-2024). Her main research focus is to study molecular, physiological pathways and mechanisms involved in the development of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, hypertension, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and Chagas disease. She performs pre-clinical and clinical studies. She coordinates the postgraduate course "Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases: from bench to the bedside." She is a reviewer for 13 indexed international journals. Since 2020, she has collaborated in the Longitudinal Study of Brazilian Health, ELSA-BRASIL. She is also a member of the Liver Center and the Brazilian Society of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (SBFte). She develops projects in technological innovation with the development of a medical device for the quantification of hepatic steatosis. Dr. Anissa is a member of the research directory group entitled: Longitudinal Study of Adult Health - RJ/Fiocruz Research Center, coordinated by Dr. Rosane Griep/IOC and leader of the CNPq research group entitled: Study group on pathophysiology and therapy of chronic non-communicable and infectious diseases.

Luciano Fadiga

M.D., Ph.D. He has a deep knowledge of and experience in electrophysiology in monkeys (single neurons recordings) and humans (transcranial magnetic stimulation, study of spinal excitability and brain imaging). His current research include the study of the relationships between action and language and the realization of brain-computer interfaces specifically designed for human use.