Advisory Board and Editors Cognitive Disorders

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Bernard J Baars

Bernard J. Baars (born 1946, Amsterdam) is a former Senior Fellow in Theoretical Neurobiology at The Neurosciences Institute in La Jolla, CA., directed by the late Gerald M. Edelman. Baars is currently an Affiliated Fellow.

He is best known as the originator of Global Workspace Theory (GWT), an empirical theory of human cognition and consciousness, developed with Stan Franklin as a computational architecture. A number of neuroscience groups in the US and Europe are pursuing this approach, including Stanislas Dehaene in Paris and Nikos Logothetis at the Max Planck Institute, Tuebingen. "Consciousness science" is now an established field, with a large brain and psychological literature.

In 2013, a major update called Dynamic Global Workspace Theory (D-GWT) appeared. (Baars, Franklin & Ramsoy, 2013, Frontiers). This work proceeds.

Baars served as a professor of psychology at the State University of New York, Stony Brook, where he studied laboratory-evoked human errors. The same factors plausibly cause spontaneous errors as well, a significant practical as well as scientific problem. Involuntary errors are directly relevant to the basic question of voluntary control.

Baars co-founded the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness, and the Elsevier journal Consciousness & Cognition, with William P. Banks.

Please see my 2015 article on Consciousness in Scholarpedia, summarizing the empirical evidence (which is often said not to exist... !).

Matthew K Belmonte

Matthew Belmonte's research asks how domain-general cognitive capacities shape the developmental emergence of both social and non-social perception, cognition and action -- giving rise to individual differences therein and autistic disorders thereof. Applying both cognitive neuroimaging (EEG/ERP and fMRI) and behavioural methods, Belmonte enunciated the now widely accepted and supported theory of dysconnectivity within and between autistic neural and cognitive networks, in which differences of local neural network entropy perturb activity-dependent development of long-range network connectivity, impairing top-down integrative control and enhancing autonomous processing. A current clinical application of this work assays the effect of computer-assisted training of prerequisite motor skills on autistic social communicative ability, whilst work in basic science is exploring interactions of dimensional autistic traits, cognitive sex differences, individualistic versus collectivistic cultures, and situational manipulations of psychological distance and level of construal. Belmonte is the recipient of a 2009 Faculty Early Career Development Award from the US National Science Foundation, the 2010 Neil O'Connor Award from the British Psychological Society, and a 2011 Fulbright-Nehru Fellowship.

Kevin J. Black

I am a movement disorders neuropsychiatrist. My research is primarily focused on neuroimaging and dopamine, especially in people with Tourette syndrome and Parkinson disease. I have also developed methods for structural imaging volumetry, analysis of brain images in nonhuman species, pharmacological fMRI (phMRI), and statistical analysis of anatomy-function relationships in deep brain stimulation (DBS).

Anna M. Borghi

Interested in: Perception and action - Affordances - Social and relational affordances; Language grounding in sensorimotor processes; Impact of language on categorization and sense of body; Categorization and conceptualization. Using mostly experimental laboratory methods (behavioral and kinematics studies), but also computer simulations (neural networks).

Mark Boyes

Senior Research Fellow in the School of Psychology, Curtin University. Research Associate in the Centre for Evidence-Based Intervention, University of Oxford.

Interests span health, developmental, and clinical psychology, with the overarching aim of understanding how both individual difference and social/community variables are related to psychological, social, and educational outcomes across the life-span. I am particularly interested in individual differences in cognitive and self-regulatory processes (such as appraisal, coping, and emotion regulation) and their potential links with emotional vulnerability.

Caroline Brennan

I did my PhD at King's College London in the Lab of Prof J.M. Littleton working on adaptive mechanisms underlying drug dependence. I demonstrated adaptive changes in the number of DHP sensitive VOCC following chronic exposure to central depressant drugs and showed that these changes were associated with genetic vulnerability to drug dependence.

I undertook post-doc training at the Clinical Research Centre Harrow, UK before joining the laboratory of Prof Nigel Holder at The Randall Institute, KCL and moving with him to UCL in 1998. Whilst at KCL and UCL I used zebrafish as a genetic model system for analysis of mechanisms underlying development.

Since 2000, I have been a Lecturer in Molecular Genetics in the School of Biological Sciences QMUL. Our work combines the two areas of my expertise: Molecular mechanisms underlying drug dependence and zebrafish as a developmental genetic model system. We have developed behavioural assays of drug seeking, compulsive drug seeking and relapse in zebrafish and are establishing lines of fish in which to explore the genetics contributing to these behaviours.

Luciano Fadiga

M.D., Ph.D. He has a deep knowledge of and experience in electrophysiology in monkeys (single neurons recordings) and humans (transcranial magnetic stimulation, study of spinal excitability and brain imaging). His current research include the study of the relationships between action and language and the realization of brain-computer interfaces specifically designed for human use.

Beth Fairfield

Since completing my Ph.D. in Italy in Psychology my research interests have centered on Memory and Aging, emotion and cognition, binding and Source monitoring. I am currently a researcher at the University of Chieti, Italy where I teach Cognitive Psychology and Psychology of memory and aging.

Claire M. Fletcher-Flinn

Claire Fletcher-Flinn has more than 24 years of experience as a university researcher and teacher, and is a registered Educational Psychologist. Her research interests include the processes of learning to read, early literacy, and dyslexia. She was awarded a Visiting Fellow at the University of Oxford, and was the recipient of a Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Invitation Fellowship.

Tamas Fulop

Dr. Tamàs Fülöp is Assistant Director of the Age Research Centre and Full Professor within the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at the Université de Sherbrooke in Quebec, Canada. He is also Head of the Immune Inflammation Laboratory and Medical Director of the Memory Clinic.

M.D: From the Unversity of Geneva.

His postdoctoral research was in the biochemistry of connective tissues, and his PhD is in immunology and gerontology. His research interest is aging in relation to immunity.

Diane P Hanger

Professor of Neuroscience at King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience.

Beth Jefferies

Beth is a Professor of Psychology at the University of York, UK. Her research seeks to understand the neural basis of semantic cognition and language, and disorders affecting these aspects of cognition. She uses multiple neuroscientific methods, including neuropsychology, neuroimaging (MEG, fMRI) and brain stimulation to investigate how concepts are represented and flexibly retrieved.

Outstanding Doctoral Research Contributions to Psychology (2004)
Elizabeth Warrington Prize - British Neuropsychological Society (2008)
Cortex Prize - Federation of European Societies of Neuropsychology (2010)