Advisory Board and Editors Computational Biology

PeerJ Factsheet
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I told my colleagues that PeerJ is a journal where they need to publish if they want their paper to be published quickly and with the strict peer review expected from a good journal.
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Christopher D. Brown

Assistant Professor, Department of Genetics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

C. Titus Brown

Titus Brown received his BA in Math from Reed College in 1997, and his PhD in Developmental Biology at Caltech in 2006. He has worked in digital evolution, climate measurements, molecular and evolutionary developmental biology, and both regulatory genomics and transcriptomics. His current focus is on using novel computer science data structures and algorithms to explore big sequencing data sets from metagenomics and transcriptomics.

Jeremy A. Bruenn

Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, SUNY/Buffalo (1987-present)
International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses (1986-present)
Senior Scientist, Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute (1999-2002)

Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley
Postdoctoral Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Vince Calhoun

Dr. Calhoun is currently Executive Science Officer at the Mind Research Network and Professor in the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of New Mexico. He is the author of over 250 full journal articles and over 350 conference proceedings. His focus is the development of data driven approaches for the analysis of brain imaging data, data fusion of multi-modal imaging and genetics data, and the identification of biomarkers for disease.

Fabien Campagne

Assistant Professor at the Weill Cornell Medical College (WCMC). Associate Director, Biomedical Informatics Core, Clinical and Translational Science Center, WCMC. My laboratory specializes on the development of approaches and software tools to enable new discoveries in biology and translational research (e.g., RbDe, GPCR-OKB, Goby, GobyWeb, a few others that did not stick). See http://campagnelab.org for recent projects and biomedical focus.

Reed A Cartwright

Head of Human and Comparative Genomics Laboratory in the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University. Affiliated faculty with the Center for Evolution and Medicine, ASU.

My research is at the interface of genetics, statistics, and software development. I am primarily interested in developing statistical models to estimate evolutionary process from large, genomic datasets. Currently most of my research is connected to mutations.

Jennifer T Chayes

Chayes is a leader in the field of network science, with applications in computer science, economics, biology and math. She is founder and Managing Director of Microsoft Research New England and NYC, and was previously Professor of Math at UCLA. She received an NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship, a Sloan Fellowship and the ABI Women of Vision Leadership Award. She was a member of the IAS Princeton, is a Fellow of the AAAS, ACM, AMS and is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Jun Chen

Assistant Professor of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic. Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. My research concerns the development and application of powerful and robust statistical methods for high-dimensional "omics" data, arising from modern high-throughput technologies such as microarray and next-generation sequencing. I am particularly interested in methods for microbiome sequencing data. Much of this effort is motivated by ongoing collaborations in projects that study the role of the human microbiome in disease pathogenesis using metagenomic sequencing.

Research interests include statistical genetics, genomics and metagenomics; and high-dimensional statistics.

Michele Clamp

Graduated from Oxford University in physics and proceeded to a physics PhD at Manchester University. Saw the light and came over to biology through protein structure prediction into genome annotation. Founded the Ensembl database alongside Ewan Birney and Tim Hubbard at the Sanger Institute. Crossed the pond to the Broad Institute where many mammals were sequenced and the human gene count trimmed of its fat. Had a short enjoyable interlude in the commercial sphere at Bioteam and is now residing at Harvard University with fingers in many pies.

Christopher Cooper

Senior Lecturer in Biological Sciences at the University of Huddersfield, since 2015. Previously Junior Research Fellow, College Lecturer In Biochemistry and various postdocs at the University of Oxford (2013-15). Working on DNA replication, genome integrity and transcription factors in human cancers (and also in prokaryotes). Additional interests in phylogenomics and novel protein expression systems.

Ben Corry

I spend my time trying to understand the proteins known as ion channels that are responsible for electrical signalling in cells using simulation and fluorescence. I am fascinated by how organisms can survive despite the chaos taking place at the molecular level.

I received my PhD from the Australian National University in 2003. After 9 years in 'The Wild West' (Perth, WA) where I won the 2008 West Australian Young Scientist of the Year 2008, I have found my way back to work at the ANU.

Keith A Crandall

Keith A. Crandall, PhD is the founding Director of the Computational Biology Institute at George Washington University. Professor Crandall studies the computational biology, population genetics, and bioinformatics, developing and testing of Big Data methods DNA sequence analysis. He applies such methods to the study of the evolution of both infectious diseases (especially HIV) and crustaceans (especially crayfish). Professor Crandall has published over 260 peer reviewed publications, as well as three books. He has been a Fulbright Visiting Scholar to Oxford University and an Allen Wilson Centre Sabbatical Fellow at the University of Auckland. Professor Crandall has received a number of awards for research and teaching, including the American Naturalist Society Young Investigator Award, an NSF CAREER Award, a PhRMA Foundation Faculty Development Award in Bioinformatics, Honors Professor of the Year award at Brigham Young University, ISI Highly Cited Researcher, and the Edward O. Wilson Naturalist Award. He was also recently elected a Fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and a Fellow of the Linnean Society of London. Professor Crandall earned his BA degree from Kalamazoo College in Biology and Mathematics, an MA degree from Washington University in Statistics, and a PhD from Washington University School of Medicine in Biology and Biomedical Sciences. He also served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Puyo, Ecuador.