Advisory Board and Editors Epidemiology

PeerJ Factsheet
A one-page facts and stats PDF, to help when considering journal options with your co-authors.

Keith A Crandall

Founding Director of the Computational Biology Institute at George Washington University. Past Chair of the Department of Biology at Brigham Young University. PhD in Biology and Biomedical Sciences from Washington University in St. Louis.

José G B Derraik

Dr José Derraik was born in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), but moved to New Zealand in 1995. José has a very broad academic background, with a BSc and MSc in Ecology from the University of Otago (New Zealand), and a PhD in Public Health (University of Otago). His MSc examined invertebrate biodiversity in human-modified habitats. His PhD focused on vector ecology, more precisely on mosquitoes in New Zealand and how the threat of a mosquito-borne disease outbreak has been affected by ongoing anthropogenic environmental change. José then worked as a Senior Advisor for MAF Biosecurity NZ, where he provided expert advice to the NZ government on biosecurity threats to human health.

In 2008, José joined the Liggins Institute (University of Auckland) where he has been working on paediatric research, as well as on a number of clinical trials in adolescents and adults at risk of metabolic disease. His research focuses primarily on the long-term effects of early life events (such as preterm or post-term birth) in childhood. However, José has recently been appointed as an honorary research associate at Uppsala University in Sweden, where alongside his Swedish colleagues he has been examining also the long-term effects of early life events in adulthood.

Lastly, José is currently involved in a large multi-institutional project (A Better Start) in New Zealand, with a leading role in a number of studies aiming to predict, prevent, and mitigate childhood obesity in the country.

Dorothy D. Dunlop

Dr. Dunlop is a health services researcher with expertise in statistical methodology. Her applied research interests include the investigation of physical activity to prevent disability in older adults and to understand the consequences of arthritis and other musculoskeletal disorders. She co-authored a book on statistical methodology; she has published and applied statistical methods for analyzing longitudinal data. Dr. Dunlop is the principle investigator on an NIH-funded epidemiologic study on the relationship of physical activity to reduce disability and an NIH-funded study to evaluate the cost effectiveness of a physical activity intervention.
She has served on data safety monitoring boards, on executive committees of federally funded clinical trials, and on the editorial boards of medical journals.

Mark C Enright

2015 – date Professor of Medical Microbiology, School of Healthcare Sciences, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK
2013 – 2015 Consultant and Lead advisor to Synthetic Genomics Vaccine Inc. La Jolla, CA. USA
2011 – 2014 Visiting Professor, University of Bath, UK
2010 – 2012 Research Director, AmpliPhi Biosciences Corporation, Sharnbrook, UK and Virginia BioTechnology Research Park, Richmond, USA
2008 – 2010 Director, Intelligent Fabric Technologies PLC
2005 – 2010 Reader then Professor, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, UK
2000 – 2005 Reader / Senior research fellow, University of Bath, UK
1997 - 2000 Postdoctoral research fellow - University of Oxford, UK

D. Gareth Evans

Prof. Evans has established a national and international reputation in clinical and research aspects of cancer genetics, particularly in neurofibromatosis and breast cancer. He has developed a clinical service for cancer genetics in the North West Region of England. He is an important opinion leader nationally through membership of committees and was chairman of the NICE Familial Breast Cancer Guideline Development Group (2002-2010) and is now clinical lead (2011-). He lectures on hereditary breast cancer and cancer syndromes. He has developed a national training program for clinicians, nurses and genetic counsellors in breast cancer genetics and established a system for risk assessment and counselling for breast cancer in Calman breast units implemented through a training course (1998-2011).

He has published 672 peer reviewed research publications; 255 as first or senior author. He has published over 100 reviews and chapters and has had a book published by Oxford University Press on familial cancer. In the last 5 years he has raised over £35 million in grants for multicentre and local studies – approximately £31 million to Manchester. He is Chief Investigator on two (£1.59 & £1 million) NIHR program grant (2009-2014 and 2016-2020) on breast cancer risk prediction and also has an NIHR RfPB grant as CI (2011). He has led a successful bid for a Nationally funded NF2 service (£7.5 million pa) that started in 2010 and is involved in the national complex NF1 service.

Dina M Fonseca

Professor of Entomology, Dr. Fonseca teaches courses in Medical and Veterinary Entomology and Population Genetics, researches the ecology and evolution of invasive species and does extension research on ways to control invasive mosquitoes. She has a B.S. in Biology and Geology from the University of Coimbra, Portugal, and a Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolution from the University of Pennsylvania, USA. Geneticist at the Smithsonian where she is still a Research Associate, then Assistant Curator at the Academy of Natural Sciences. Dr. Fonseca joined Rutgers University in 2007.

Alex W. Friedrich

Prof. dr. Alex W. Friedrich is professor in Medical Microbiology and Infection Prevention at the University of Groningen, and Head of the Department of Medical Microbiology and Infection Control at the UMCG since 2011. He is experienced in infection control, hospital hygiene, and infection epidemiology. Further, he is member of the executive committee of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease (ESCMID), member of the European Committee on Infection Control (EUCIC), member of the German commission for Antiinfektiva, Resistenz und Therapie (ART) at the Robert Koch Institute (German National Antibiotic Commission), member of the board of the Dutch Stichting Werkgroep Antibitoticabeleid (SWAB) (Dutch National Antibiotic Commission), deputy chair of the scientific work group of the DGHM for infection prevention and antibiotic resistance in hospital hygiene, and member of the scientific council of the European medical school (EMS) Groningen-Oldenburg. His recent research focuses on antimicrobial resistance, antimicrobial stewardship, and epidemiology. He has published 170 peer-reviewed papers.

Simon DW Frost

Reader in Pathogen Dynamics at the University of Cambridge; formerly Adjunct Associate Professor in the Dept. of Pathology, University of California San Diego (UCSD). Graduated with a BA in Natural Sciences (1st class), Trinity College, Cambridge (1992), DPhil in Mathematical Biology, Merton College, Oxford (1996). Postdoctoral positions at Princeton University, Oxford University, University of Edinburgh and UCSD. Awards include: NATO Postdoctoral Fellowship (1996), MRC Nonclinical Training Fellowship (1997-2000), a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award (2008-2013), and Thomson-Reuters Highly Cited Researcher awards in 2014, 2015, and 2016.

Gregory E. Gilbert

Dr. Gilbert is a biostatistician with Learning Sciences, Adtalem Global Education. He also holds appointments as an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Center for Teaching & Learning, Ross University School of Medicine and the Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, Drexel University. He received a BA in Psychology from Baylor University, Master of Science in Public Health with a concentration in Biostatistics & Epidemiology from the University of South Carolina, and a Doctorate of Education from Argosy University. Dr. Gilbert is also credentialed as a Professional Statistician (PStat®) by the American Statistical Association.

He has extensive experience in survival analysis, longitudinal data analysis including the use of mixed models, psychometrics, and G theory. Dr. Gilbert also has substantial experience in medical education, nursing education, veterinary education, and the quantitative evaluation of instructional modalities and health educational systems.

Dr. Gilbert holds membership in four scholastic honor societies is a reviewer for of numerous journals, and serves on the editorial board for three journals. Dr. Gilbert has published over 60 peer-reviewed articles & has made numerous conference presentations in fields of study complementing his interests.

Jason M.R. Gill

Professor of Cardio-metabolic Health in the Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences at the University of Glasgow. Lead an active multi-disciplinary research group investigating the effects of exercise and diet on the prevention and management of vascular and metabolic diseases from the molecular to the whole-body level. Major research interests include: why certain population groups appear to be particularly susceptible to the adverse effects of a ‘Westernised’ lifestyle, and how lifestyle interventions can modulate this excess risk; the interactions between physical activity, energy balance, body fatness and disease risk; and the mechanisms by which exercise regulates lipoprotein metabolism. Member of the NICE guidelines update committee for prevention of type 2 diabetes, and was member of development groups for the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) guidelines for the prevention and treatment of obesity and for prevention of cardiovascular disease. Past Chair of the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES) Division of Physical Activity for Health and Fellow of BASES. Director of the MSc programme in Sport and Exercise Science & Medicine at the University of Glasgow.

Andrew R Gray

Consulting biostatistician in the Division of Health Sciences at the University of Otago. In this role, I provide biostatistical expertise to a wide range of researchers on a large number of projects. Much of this is through collaborative relationships as a co-investigator with the remainder through more informal consulting relationships. I have particular interests in obesity research, especially in pediatric populations; nuts as a functional food; respiratory epidemiology; and sun protection. Prior to my current position I was a software metrics and machine learning researcher in the Department of Information Science at the same institution.