Richard Schuster
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Richard Schuster


Summary

I am a quantitative conservation biologist and a Liber Ero Postdoctoral Fellow at Carleton University. My research focuses on finding ways to optimize the allocation of sparse conservation funds using citizen science data. The goal is to pin-point where conservation actions should focus in the places where species breed, overwinter or stop over during migration.

Previously I worked on: “Cross-boundary Planning for Resilience and Restoration of Endangered Oak Savannah and Coastal Douglas-fir Forest Ecosystems” partly funded by the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative.

For my PhD I investigated systematic conservation planning in human-dominated landscapes and developed novel techniques to maximize efficiency in biodiversity conservation via carbon sequestration and land management. This work provided guidelines to successfully fund conservation investments and highlighted their potential benefits and shortfalls.

Biodiversity Biogeography Conservation Biology Ecology Environmental Sciences

Work details

Liber Ero Postdoctoral Fellow

Carleton University
November 2016
department of biology
Project: Combining full annual cycle population models and conservation optimization to address population declines of migratory birds in Canada. Primary mentor institutions: Carleton University (Dr. Joseph Bennett), Cornell Lab of Ornithology (Dr. Amanda Rodewald), Environment Canada (Dr. Scott Wilson), Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center (Dr. Peter Marra), Boreal Songbird Initiative (Dr. Jeff Wells)

PhD student

University of British Columbia
May 2010 - July 2014
For my PhD I investigated systematic conservation planning in human-dominated landscapes and developed novel techniques to maximize efficiency in biodiversity conservation via carbon sequestration and land management. This work provided guidelines to successfully fund conservation investments and highlighted their potential benefits and shortfalls.

Post-doctoral researcher (10h/week)

University of British Columbia
July 2014 - June 2015
Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences
Web application development for the Marxan conservation planning software Application and extension of PhD thesis methods to regional and local government levels

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

The Nature Trust of British Columbia
June 2015 - March 2016
Cross-boundary Planning for Resilience and Restoration of Endangered Oak Savannah and Coastal Douglas-fir Forest Ecosystems Tax shifting as an option for funding conservation initiatives Species distribution model performance using multiple modelling techniques and variable types Relative Ecological Assessment Tool updates for TNTBC

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