Paleontology and Evolutionary Science

Breakdown of coevolution between symbiotic bacteria Wolbachia and their filarial hosts

Editor rating: 7 / 10

Marta Sánchez –– This well down study add an interesting piece of information to understanding of Wolbachia-host associations, adding complexity to the existing knowledge and providing new hypothesis on the origin of this endosymbiont.
Stratigraphy, palaeoenvironments and palaeoecology of the Loch Humphrey Burn lagerstätte and other Mississippian palaeobotanical localities of the Kilpatrick Hills, southwest Scotland

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Graciela Piñeiro –– The article includes an interdisciplinary study of Carboniferous micro and macrofloristic assemblages. It is an interesting contribution to understand the relatively relevance of calibrating palynologic versus macrofloristic studies for biostratigrafic correlation even in a regional context.
Taxonomic and systematic revisions to the North American Nimravidae (Mammalia, Carnivora)

Editor rating: 7 / 10

Kenneth De Baets –– One of the first more quantitative studies of phylogeny of North American Nimravids exploring various new or not yet used methods for this purpose, which might also be useful to apply to other extant and extinct groups.
Monogenean anchor morphometry: systematic value, phylogenetic signal, and evolution

Editor rating: 7 / 10

Jean-Lou Justine –– A very complete study with many modern techniques.
Inside-out flowers of Lacandonia brasiliana (Triuridaceae) provide new insights into fundamental aspects of floral patterning

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Luis Eguiarte –– The inverted flowers of Lacandonia schismatica, where the male parts are central and surrounded by the female parts, are almost unique among angiosperms. Until recently, Lacandonia was known only from a single species, L. schismatica, endemic to the rain forests of southeastern Mexico. The paper describes the ontogeny of the flowers of Lacandonia brasiliana, a recently discovered species from the extreme north of the Atlantic Forest in northeastern Brazil. The close similarity between the two Lacandonia species makes it unlikely that they arose independently. The detailed comparative analyses of the paper make it an important contribution to the study of the evolution of these “inside-out” flowers.
Systematics of the Rubidgeinae (Therapsida: Gorgonopsia)

Editor rating: 7 / 10

Hans-Dieter Sues –– Long-overdue rigorous review of an important group of large predatory non-mammalian synapsids from the Late Permian.
Revisiting the Zingiberales: using multiplexed exon capture to resolve ancient and recent phylogenetic splits in a charismatic plant lineage

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Alexander Mikheyev –– Provides a well-documented bioinformatic pipeline, and a comprehensive investigation of the process.
Revised phylogenetic analysis of the Aetosauria (Archosauria: Pseudosuchia); assessing the effects of incongruent morphological character sets

Editor rating: 7 / 10

Andrew Farke –– most in-depth phylogeny yet for this globally distributed group; advancement of phylogenetic methods with broad interest to researchers
Rates and modes of body size evolution in early carnivores and herbivores: a case study from Captorhinidae

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Laura Wilson –– Body size evolution is a fundamental subject of study across life science research. This article uses state-of-the-field modeling approaches to test a key hypothesis in the evolution of early carnivores and herbivores, allowing for robust, quantitative conclusions to be drawn.
Convex-hull mass estimates of the dodo (Raphus cucullatus): application of a CT-based mass estimation technique

Editor rating: 7 / 10

Mark Young –– This manuscript takes a thorough and sophisticated approach to unravelling the potential body mass of the iconic Dodo.

Discussing these articles

Rubidgea was a big, gnarly-looking gorgonopsid that combined the best features of a bear, sabercat, and warthog. Trying to get back into drawing by doing some #synapsid sketches, this one is based on this paper by @Synapsida https://t.co/sHvmxMhgix https://t.co/pO9gS6xcE3

105 days ago
Just templates for doing some basic (and obligatory, my opinion) phylo- #networks when analysing morphological data of extinct organisms (such as #dinosaurs) e.g. using the Aetosauria matrix by W. G. Parker (2016; https://t.co/SqlABSQB4I) https://t.co/Ix00gbDVMs via @figshare