Paleontology and Evolutionary Science

Observed shifts in the contact zone between two forms of the diving beetle Hydroporus memnonius are consistent with predictions from sexual conflict

Editor rating: 7 / 10

Dezene Huber –– Shows an interesting range expansion of a morphology within a species. Not clear on the reason (authors suggest sexual conflict). But an interesting phenomenon that takes some careful observation to notice, and worth further study.
Geometric morphometric analysis of intratrackway variability: a case study on theropod and ornithopod dinosaur trackways from Münchehagen (Lower Cretaceous, Germany)

Editor rating: 7 / 10

Herbert Maschner –– Trackways are one of the more important areas of paleontological research and this paper develops a suite of techniques to quantify the analysis of ancient trackways.
A review and phylogeny of Scarabaeine dung beetle fossils (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae), with the description of two Canthochilum species from Dominican amber

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Kenneth De Baets –– This is a nice cross-discipline effort between paleontologist and biologists to calibrate the evolutionary history of scarab beetles. It describes new fossils and using various methods to test their phylogenetic position based on the characters they possess. It should be useful for people working on scarab beetles as well as people working on similar effort for other groups.
Integrative taxonomy of Metrichia Ross (Trichoptera: Hydroptilidae: Ochrotrichiinae) microcaddisflies from Brazil: descriptions of twenty new species

Editor rating: 8 / 10

James Reimer –– Integrative taxonomy combining morphology and molecular data, and 20 new species from Brazil in one fell swoop - nice work.
Systematics of stalked jellyfishes (Cnidaria: Staurozoa)

Editor rating: 7 / 10

Tim Collins –– This manuscript presents a new phylogenetic hypothesis for the stalked jellyfishes, which differs significantly from the traditional taxonomy of the group. It therefore implies a novel view of the evolutionary history of the group.
The phylogenetic relationships of basal archosauromorphs, with an emphasis on the systematics of proterosuchian archosauriforms

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Hans-Dieter Sues –– Major reassessment of previously poorly document but phylogenetically important group of archosauromorph reptiles.
Understanding form and function of the stem in early flattened echinoderms (pleurocystitids) using a microstructural approach

Editor rating: 7 / 10

Kenneth De Baets –– The authors present an interesting new approach to assess the skeletal function and mode of life of extinct echinoderms by using the relationship between stereom structure and the presence of ligament and/or muscles. This is not only relevant for researchers working on the particular group of echinoderms they investigated, but also for all other people working on other echinoderms and other extinct organisms.
Plastome data reveal multiple geographic origins of Quercus Group Ilex

Editor rating: 7 / 10

James Reimer –– The oak genus Quercus is well studied, yet has always presented questions with regard to its confusing and confounding evolutionary history based on analyses of different phylogenetic data sets. The current study uses wide-scale sampling and analyses to show how polyphyletic plastome origins and potential unidirectional introgression may have shaped the evolutionary history of this commercially important group.
The macroevolution of size and complexity in insect male genitalia

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Leon Higley –– Diversity in genital structures is a longstanding biological conundrum, and this papers helps resolve some of the mystery.
Anatomy and osteohistology of the basal hadrosaurid dinosaur Eotrachodon from the uppermost Santonian (Cretaceous) of southern Appalachia

Editor rating: 7 / 10

Christopher Noto –– This describes an important new specimen from a part of North America that is virtually unknown during the Late Cretaceous. Any new specimen provides valuable data.

Discussing these articles

@NicholasAG72 @TomHoltzPaleo @Dean_R_Lomax @dustydino A few Cretaceous beetle fossils and trace fossils have been attributed to dung beetles, but their identification is not definitive (https://t.co/Ni93dHiur5).

@FieldMuseum Other #dinosaurs known from the late Cretaceous of Alabama include: Appalachiosaurus montgomeriensis, Eotrachodon orientalis, an undescribed nodosaur, ornithomimid, and a dromeosaur. Eotrachodon is the newest Dino described just last year! https://t.co/fbttUzdPCz

Archosauromorph phylogeny https://t.co/jRrnxvLJuH vía @thePeerJ

'Systematics of stalked jellyfishes (Cnidaria: Staurozoa)' published 1 year ago today #OpenAccess @thePeerJ https://t.co/StziYCKjBB