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Species turnover reveals hidden effects of decreasing nitrogen deposition in mountain hay meadows (2019) PeerJ

Douglas Burns | 6 February 2019

Tagged: good-work

Roth et al. present results of an analysis of change in vascular plant community structure at 129 sites in Switzerland over a 15-year period (2003-17) during which atmospheric nitrogen deposition had declined by about 15%. Their results show only weak shifts in plant community structure and little change in species richness. However, marked species turnover was noted with colonizing species likely to be more oligotrophic and to have higher indicator values for temperature. This suggests that climate change as well as atmospheric nitrogen deposition are affecting long-term patterns in these mountain hay meadow communities.

Species turnover reveals hidden effects of decreasing nitrogen deposition in mountain hay meadows (2019) PeerJ. 10.7717/peerj.6347

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About Douglas Burns

Academic Editor
I study the effects of anthropogenic activities on the cycling of chemical elements in ecosystems. My particular area of interest is on the biogeochemical and hydrological processes that control the cycling of mercury, nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur at the watershed scale. A recent focus is the effects of climate change on streamflow with an emphasis on high flows and implications for water quality.