Biodiversity and Conservation

The effect of climate change on the distribution of a tropical zoanthid (Palythoa caribaeorum) and its ecological implications

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Anastazia Banaszak –– It addresses the effects of climate change on the distribution of a tropical species
Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus) feeding behavior on static fishing gear, effect of SMART (Selective Magnetic and Repellent-Treated) hook deterrent technology, and factors influencing entanglement in bottom longlines

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Magnus Johnson –– This is an enigmatic species, long-lived species of which little is known.
Is the future already here? The impact of climate change on the distribution of the eastern coral snake (Micrurus fulvius)

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Mark Costello –– It suggests that sea snakes are already changing their distribution in response to climate change.
The contribution of Earth observation technologies to the reporting obligations of the Habitats Directive and Natura 2000 network in a protected wetland

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Louise Willemen –– Decision makers need informative maps of wetlands. This study shows the variation in wetland maps resulting from different classification methods and as such highlighting the uncertainty of map classes. The way wetland maps are made impacts the planning and evaluation policies.
Evolutionary persistence in Gunnera and the contribution of southern plant groups to the tropical Andes biodiversity hotspot

Editor rating: 9 / 10

Luis Eguiarte –– Gunnera is a genus of plants that have fascinated scientist for a long time, in particular for the very large leaves of some species and because its symbiotic relationship with the nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria Nostoc. For a many years, some botanists suspected it to be a very old, primitive genus, perhaps basal in the phylogeny of the Angiosperms. While latter molecular phylogenies did not support this position, this paper shows that indeed Gunnera is an old genus, with a complex evolutionary and phylogeographic history, and a recent radiation in the Andes. All these new results are relevant for understanding why the Neotropics have so many plant species, more than any other similar region in the planet.
Out of Asia: mitochondrial evolutionary history of the globally introduced supralittoral isopod Ligia exotica

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Curtis Daehler –– This work provides genetic evidence suggesting the native range of a widely distributed animal that was accidentally spread by humans starting hundreds of years ago.
The little shrimp that could: phylogeography of the circumtropical Stenopus hispidus (Crustacea: Decapoda), reveals divergent Atlantic and Pacific lineages

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Xavier Pochon –– This study provides the first range-wide phylogeographic study of the banded coral shrimp S. hispidus, extending across more than 27,000 km of the globe. Coalescence analysis brings evidence that an isolated Indo-Pacific lineage evolved from a rare dispersal event from the Atlantic around South Africa via the Benguela Current, thereby colonizing the Indian and Pacific Oceans, followed by dispersal across the Indo-Pacific in the last 200,000 years. Surprisingly, this benthic coral reef associated shrimp shows a single haplotype dominating the largest continuous tropical oceanic expanse on the planet.
Moving to 3D: relationships between coral planar area, surface area and volume

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Ronaldo Francini-Filho –– Tech tools for coral reef research are emerging fast and boosting science
Molecular phylogenetics of swimming crabs (Portunoidea Rafinesque, 1815) supports a revised family-level classification and suggests a single derived origin of symbiotic taxa

Editor rating: 9 / 10

Mohammad Shamsur Rahman –– very much fantastic work in the field of taxonomy, both in classical and molecular approach!
Boundaries in ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) and environmental variables at the edges of forest patches with residential developments

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Scott Ferrenberg –– This article introduces, in a tangible way, methods for combining biological data with environmental data to identify boundaries and edge effects free of bias from the human point of view. This set of techniques could substantially improve our understanding of why species are affected by some edge conditions but go seemingly unaffected by others. The potential use of this approach in conservation and protected area delineation is clear, but I also see other possible applications such as determining the factors that influence spatial patterns in plant productivity and biogeochemical processes.

Discussing these articles

Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus) feeding #behavior on static fishing gear, effect of SMART (Selective Magnetic and Repellent-Treated) hook deterrent technology, and factors influencing entanglement in bottom longlines https://t.co/j98OJtoESL @thePeerJ https://t.co/7CFTTu50BR

Proud of my first Honors Fellow, Jenny Archis, whose thesis work was publisehd today! https://t.co/iKPqGvi7Fj

The little shrimp that could: phylogeography of the circumtropical Stenopus hispidus (Crustacea: Decapoda), reveals divergent Atlantic and Pacific lineages https://t.co/TXOB7dyxro https://t.co/QkZN9Zfxz0

The contribution of Earth observation technologies to the reporting obligations of the Habitats Directive and Natura 2000 network in a protected wetland https://t.co/weyB2H9zM0 via @thePeerJ

Hot off the press – The contribution of southern plant groups to the tropical Andes biodiversity hotspot! https://t.co/5O6fZBPI8M #Biogeography #Evolution #Neotropics @GGBC_GU @thePeerJ

My first publication! On shifting the measurement of corals from 2D to 3D @thePeerJ https://t.co/g99voUOOTv #Biodiversity #Ecology #MarineBiology #StAndrews

116 days ago
Portunoid crab molecular phylogenetics https://t.co/27iDHwJL4z @thePeerJさんから

An article I handled as editor has been published today @thePeerJ https://t.co/6YlbJ7SYQS #Biodiversity #Biogeography #ConservationBiology