Aquatic Biology

Testing animal-assisted cleaning prior to transplantation in coral reef restoration

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Mark Costello –– Provides useful method to improve coral transplantation techniques. Also, shows beneficial interactions between 3-D habitat, fish grazing and survival of coral polyps.
Isthminia panamensis, a new fossil inioid (Mammalia, Cetacea) from the Chagres Formation of Panama and the evolution of ‘river dolphins’ in the Americas

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Mark Young –– This manuscript helps eludicate the origin of a freshwater radiation of tooth cetaceans (odontocetes), one clade of 'river dolphins'.
Let’s be pals again: major systematic changes in Palaemonidae (Crustacea: Decapoda)

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Magnus Johnson –– This is a major revision of an important taxonomic group.
A population genetic assessment of coral recovery on highly disturbed reefs of the Keppel Island archipelago in the southern Great Barrier Reef

Editor rating: 7 / 10

Mónica Medina –– It has relevance for conservation biology.
Not all jellyfish are equal: isotopic evidence for inter- and intraspecific variation in jellyfish trophic ecology

Editor rating: 7 / 10

Jack Stanford –– The paper adds significantly to our understanding of jelly fish ecology. Should be of wide interest to marine biologists and all ecologists using isotopes to understand trophic relations.
Metabarcoding dietary analysis of coral dwelling predatory fish demonstrates the minor contribution of coral mutualists to their highly partitioned, generalist diet

Editor rating: 7 / 10

Mónica Medina –– Few studies available on the topic.
Self-generated morphology in lagoon reefs

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Kenneth De Baets –– I think their modelling approach could save a lot of time and money. It would be of interest for modellers, biologists as well as people interesting to understand impact of environmental change on reefs.
Bayesian estimation of predator diet composition from fatty acids and stable isotopes

Editor rating: 7 / 10

Luis Conceição –– This work combines two methodologies - stable isotopes and fatty acid profiles - for estimating the relative contribution of different prey items in the diet of a predator
Does polyandry really pay off? The effects of multiple mating and number of fathers on morphological traits and survival in clutches of nesting green turtles at Tortuguero

Editor rating: 8 / 10

Alex Ford –– This paper contributes to the fascinating field of polyandry and multiple paternity in turtles, and addresses the important question of whether polyandry pays off.
Proteomic responses to hypoxia at different temperatures in the great scallop (Pecten maximus)

Editor rating: 7 / 10

Fabiano Thompson –– It brings new information in scalop biology.

Discussing these articles

Flame hawkfish often share their corals with other predators, like the arc-eyed hawkfish P. arcatus. Yet, molecular analyses show that these two fishes differ fundamentally in their targeted prey. Find out more here: https://t.co/pKYBJH5adT #biodiversity #25DaysOfChristmas https://t.co/2GRzWbPsFK

How reef cleaning stations became a #biomimicry inspiration for #innovation in #coralreef #restoration https://t.co/sUyywVZUz8 https://t.co/9I5xdo3jo2

370 days ago
River dolphins evolved independently on different continents & even within S. America. See also @PyensonLab review: https://t.co/AyxL5w3Yrp https://t.co/vt4hEJS6TD

Smithsonian Science News coverage
http://smithsonianscience.si.edu/2015/09/fossil-specimen-reveals-a-new-species-of-ancient-river-dolphin-to-smithsonian-scientists/

The Washington Post - Newly discovered dolphin hints at ancient transition from oceans to rivers
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2015/09/01/newly-discovered-dolphin-hints-at-ancient-transition-from-oceans-to-rivers/

Media coverage by Sid Perkins, at Science
http://news.sciencemag.org/paleontology/2015/09/river-dolphin-s-ancestor-unearthed

Media coverage by Earthtouch
http://www.earthtouchnews.com/discoveries/fossils/this-ancient-species-discovery-finally-explains-where-river-dolphins-come-from