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You examine several possible reasons for women having higher acceptance rates than men. One issue which you did not look at, and which I think may be relevant could be as follows:

If it is true that men are more likely to engage in risk than women, and given that there is a risk in submitting a PR, in that it may be rejected, is it possible that women wait until they have gained more experience...

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What about the size effect in figure 11 ? What is the Cohen’s d for the gendered outsiders ?

I read in your study : “For outsiders, while men and women perform similarly when their genders are neutral, when their genders are apparent, men’s acceptance rate is 1.2% higher than women’s (χ2(df = 1, n = 419,411) = 7, p < .01).”

For outsiders, we can see that the acceptance rate for women is 0.6188...

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Here, as well as later in the article, you are working with data with drastically different sample sizes -- summing the table you have about 3M PRs from identified men and about 140k from women, making any one pull request about 20x more likely to be from a man than from a woman.

Have you considered potential impact on this imbalance on your statistical methods?

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