Free Flow of Sweat due to Loss of Surface Tension at Sweat Droplet Causes Water-Induced Skin Wrinkling

Senior, Wayzata High School, Plymouth, MN, United States
Independent Scientist, Plymouth, MN, United States
DOI
10.7287/peerj.preprints.57v1
Subject Areas
Dermatology
Keywords
water immersion skin wrinkling, dehydration, sweating, vasoconstriction, homeostasis, surface tension, Cystic Fibrosis
Copyright
© 2013 Marasakatla et al.
Licence
This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Cite this article
Marasakatla S, Marasakatla K. 2013. Free Flow of Sweat due to Loss of Surface Tension at Sweat Droplet Causes Water-Induced Skin Wrinkling. PeerJ PrePrints 1:e57v1

Abstract

Sweat from the body is regulated by the surface tension of a sweat droplet at the pores and the pressure within the sweat duct. A sweat droplet grows in size until its surface tension and the pressure within the sweat duct are in equilibrium. When a hand is immersed in water, sweat droplets easily merge within the water, causing the pressure to drop at the pores. This in turn makes the sweat to flow freely into the water in the absence of counteracting pressure. Sweat glands produce more sweat because of the low pressure within the duct. To prevent loss of water from the body and to maintain the homeostasis, the body reacts by restricting the blood flow to the hand causing vasoconstriction and eventual wrinkling of the skin.