Visitors   Views   Downloads
NOT PEER-REVIEWED
"PeerJ Preprints" is a venue for early communication or feedback before peer review. Data may be preliminary.

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

View peer-reviewed version

Supplemental Information

Biophysical data, species summaries, explanation of acronyms listed in Fig. 4, climate diagrams of the four study sites and pheno-diagrams of all species encountered in the four study sites

Table S1: Biophysical data for the four study sites. Table S2. List of edible plant species found in each plot situated within a prominent vegetation type along the southern Cape lowlads of South Africa. The list is divided into underground storage organs and aboveground carbohydrates. Table S3.1. Species list of USOs (on left) and fruiting species (aboveground carbohydrate resources) (on right) and their acronyms encountered in the Phenology survey of the four basic vegetation types of the southern Cape lowlands to coastal margin. Table S3.2 Species list summary of USOs (on left) and fruiting species (aboveground carbohydrate resources) (on right) and their acronyms encountered in the Phenology survey of the four basic vegetation types of the southern Cape lowlands to coastal margin. Fig. S1. Climate diagrams showing temperature and rainfall patterns for the study sites during the survey period (May 2010-April 2012). Mean values of temperature and rainfall are shown in parentheses.

DOI: 10.7287/peerj.preprints.1379v1/supp-1

Explanation of columns in raw data file

This file is an explanation of "De Vynck et al. raw data". It contains descriptions of columns and detail on data collection.

DOI: 10.7287/peerj.preprints.1379v1/supp-2

Raw data collected six-weekly over two years in the four primary vegetation types, southern Cape, South Africa

The raw data are six-weekly counts, over two years, of edible plants with underground storage organs and aboveground edibles. These surveys were performed in predesignated 3.6 hectare plots of the four primary vegetation types of the southern Cape, South Africa.

DOI: 10.7287/peerj.preprints.1379v1/supp-3

Indigenous Edible Plant Use by Contemporary Khoe-San Descendants of South Africa’s Cape South Coast

The paper is in press (South African Journal of Botany) and was cited in this submitted paper to PeerJ. De Vynck et al. in press reports on an ethno-botanical survey which was performed in the southern Cape, South Africa.

DOI: 10.7287/peerj.preprints.1379v1/supp-4

Additional Information

Competing Interests

Richard M Cowling is an Academic Editor for PeerJ.

Author Contributions

Jan C De Vynck conceived and designed the experiments, performed the experiments, analyzed the data, contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools, wrote the paper, prepared figures and/or tables, reviewed drafts of the paper.

Richard M Cowling conceived and designed the experiments, analyzed the data, contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools, wrote the paper, reviewed drafts of the paper.

Alastair J Potts analyzed the data, wrote the paper, prepared figures and/or tables, reviewed drafts of the paper.

Curtis W Marean wrote the paper, reviewed drafts of the paper.

Funding

This research was funded by the Oppenheimer Memorial Trust, South Africa. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.


Add your feedback

Before adding feedback, consider if it can be asked as a question instead, and if so then use the Question tab. Pointing out typos is fine, but authors are encouraged to accept only substantially helpful feedback.

Some Markdown syntax is allowed: _italic_ **bold** ^superscript^ ~subscript~ %%blockquote%% [link text](link URL)
 
By posting this you agree to PeerJ's commenting policies