Academic Editor

Mike Holmes


Summary

Mike Holmes is an Assistant Professor and Canada Research Chair in Neuromuscular Mechanics and Ergonomics at Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada. Mike completed a Bachelor of Kinesiology (Honours) and a Master of Science (MSc. Biomechanics) from Memorial University. He obtained a PhD in Biomechanics from McMaster University and completed a one year post-doctoral fellowship from the University of Waterloo.

Combining neuroscience and biomechanics, his work aims to better understand how people become injured at work. The focus of his research program is to better understand work-related upper extremity disorders by identifying mechanisms of injury and pain related to the neuromuscular and biomechanical properties of muscles and ligaments. Using laboratory based techniques, including electromyography, motion capture, electrical stimulation, medical imaging and computer modelling, his fundamental approach leads to workplace applications and investigations.

Anatomy & Physiology Kinesiology Neuroscience

Past or current institution affiliations

Work details

Assistant Professor

Brock University
September 2016
Kinesiology
Work-related pain and injury to the upper extremities, such as carpal tunnel syndrome and repetitive strain injury, are a common cause of sick leave and disability among working adults. As Canada Research Chair in Neuromuscular Mechanics and Ergonomics, Dr. Michael Holmes is trying to understand why some people develop workplace injuries while others who perform the same work do not. Holmes and his research team are investigating how the brain determines muscle recruitment and control strategies, as well as how these influence the risk of injury. By performing workplace simulations, they hope to better understand how pain and injury interact with neural and mechanical output. Ultimately, this will lead to workplace and tool design strategies that make occupational tasks safer and more efficient and help rehabilitate those with musculoskeletal and neurological impairments.

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