Review History


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Summary

  • The initial submission of this article was received on July 3rd, 2014 and was peer-reviewed by 2 reviewers and the Academic Editor.
  • The Academic Editor made their initial decision on July 31st, 2014.
  • The first revision was submitted on August 1st, 2014 and was reviewed by the Academic Editor.
  • The article was Accepted by the Academic Editor on August 4th, 2014.

Version 0.2 (accepted)

· · Academic Editor

Accept

The revised manuscript is accepted without any further comments.

Version 0.1 (original submission)

· · Academic Editor

Minor Revisions

The work is clearly presented and written, there are only minor revisions, which should be addressed by the authors.

Reviewer 1 ·

Basic reporting

The manuscript by Sprenger et al describes a study to estimate Sexually-Transmitted Infections (STI) prevalence and sexual health care seeking behavior in HIV-infected people attending the Bern University Hospital. Tested people were males having sex with males (MSM), heterosexual men and women.
STI were more common in MSM when compared to heterosexual men and women. Differently from heterosexual men and women, most of MSM agreed that STI testing should be offered routinely (one time/year). Authors conclude that a regular assessment of sexual health in HIV-infected people, including STI and a picture of sexual history, would allow a better control of STI spreading, treatment and partner management within the population of HIV-infected individuals.
The work is clearly presented and written, however, to my opinion, the Introduction section is too long and sometimes not framed within the themes that are presented in the work. It would be advisable to shorten it , possibly focusing on aspects of the background that correlate with the objectives of the study.

Experimental design

The experimental design is correct. Authors also describe – and comment within the Discussion section – the possible few weak points of the study methods including the fact that fewer patients than planned were eligible for the study, compared to the initial planned number. However, numbers of participants are enough for providing clear results and are also in line with number reported in other studies.

Validity of the findings

Results are presented in a clear and scientific correct way and are statistically controlled. The study is essentially descriptive and interpretation of the results is, therefore, in some way already addressed on an objective direction. Rather, conclusions correctly focus more on implication for routine STI testing among HIV-infected people.

Comments for the author

No comments

Reviewer 2 ·

Basic reporting

Sprenger et al describe a study to estimate Sexually-Transmitted Infections (STI) prevalence and sexual health care seeking behavior in HIV-infected people (MSM, heterosexual men and women) attending the Bern University Hospital. MSM agreed that STI testing should be offered routinely differently from heterosexual men and women. Authors suggest that a regular assessment of sexual health in HIV-infected people would consent a control of STI spreading.

Experimental design

The work is clearly presented and written. Authors describe the possible weak points of the study methods but the experimental design is correct and the numbers of participants are enough for providing clear results.

Validity of the findings

Results are statistically controled. Authors explain results in a scientific way. The study is descriptive and conclusions correctly focus more on implication for routine STI testing among HIV-infected people.

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