Advisory Board and Editors Respiratory Medicine

Peter J. Barnes

Professor of Thoracic Medicine at the National Heart and Lung Institute, Head of Respiratory Medicine at Imperial College & Honorary Consultant Physician at Royal Brompton Hospital, London. Has been the most highly cited clinical scientist in Europe & the most highly cited respiratory researcher in the world over the last 20 years. Elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 2007. Currently a member of the Scientific Committee of the WHO/NIH global guidelines on asthma (GINA) and COPD (GOLD).
Barnes is the author of over 1,000 publications in peer reviewed journals. He has edited or co-edited over 50 books on asthma, COPD and respiratory pharmacology.
He has been received honorary degrees from the Universities of Ferrara (Italy), Athens (Greece), Tampere (Finland), Leuven (Belgium) and Maastricht (Netherlands). He co-founded an Imperial spin-out company RespiVert, which was acquired by Johnson & Johnson and has developed novel inhaled treatments for COPD and severe asthma.

Jean Bousquet

Professor of Pulmonary Medicine at the Univeristy of Montpellier. Former Director of the INSERM Laboratory for the Immunopathology of Asthma & former chairman of the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA). Founder & Chairman of ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis & its Impact on Asthma). Chairman of the WHO Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD). Former President of the Societé Française d'Allergologie et d'Immunologie Clinique. Former EiC of the journal Allergy.

Ronald G. Crystal

Professor and Chairman, Department of Genetic Medicine, and Bruce Webster Professor of Internal Medicine, at Weill Cornell Medical College. Director of the Belfer Gene Therapy Core Facility. Attending Physician at the Weill Cornell-New York Presbyterian Hospital. Previously, Chief of Pulmonary Branch, NHLBI, NIH.

Jane C. Deng

Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine.

Burton Dickey

Burton F. Dickey is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Pulmonary Medicine at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. He has studied vesicle traffic since fellowship training more than thirty years ago, and for the past seventeen years his principal focus has been airway mucin secretion. His laboratory uses a mouse genetic approach, knocking out or overexpressing genes in airway secretory cells to study their function. This approach also allows the use of these genetically modified mice in models of pathologic challenge. Together, this provides fundamental insight into the mechanism of mucin secretion and how its dysregulation contributes to pathophysiology. He has also contributed to related work on inducible epithelial resistance to infection, promotion of lung carcinogenesis by inflammation, and modulation of inflammation by β2-agonists. As a clinician, Dr. Dickey focuses on diseases of the airways to promote the transfer of knowledge between laboratory and clinic. He has founded two biotechnology companies, Pulmotect and Exotect, to develop therapeutics to treat respiratory infections and muco-obstructive lung diseases, respectively.

Mario Alberto Flores-Valdez

Dr. Mario Alberto Flores-Valdez is a Professor in the Medical and Pharmaceutical Biotechnology Unit, CIATEJ, A.C., Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico (2007-present). He is a member of the National System of Researchers (SNI), he was a Stanford University Medical Center postdoctoral fellow (2004-2007), where he received a Dean's Fellowship Award (2006) to conduct research on Tuberculosis. He worked in UNAM as Research Assistant for Prof. Jaime Mora (2004) and Prof. Emundo Calva (2003). He has received a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from UNAM (1999-2003), a M.Sc. in Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering from UANL (1996-1999) and a B.Sc. from Universidad de Sonora (1991-1996) in Chemistry and Biology. He has received fellowships from CONACYT for M.Sc. and Ph.D. studies and in M.Sc. and B.Sc. has received Diplomas as Best Student. He has reviewed articles for several peer-reviewed journal and has expertise in Tuberculosis, particularly in developing recombinant BCG strains. He has been PI for 6 grants from 2008 to date, focused in studies about tuberculosis vaccine development and basic aspects of mycobacterial physiology.

Delia Goletti

Delia Goletti MD, PhD, Infectious Diseases specialist. In 1992 she joined the Laboratory of Immunoregulation at the National Institutes of Health (chief Dr Fauci) working on HIV pathogenesis. In 1999 she joined the National Institute for Infectious Diseases in Rome. She has clinical duties on the tuberculosis (TB) clinic and responsibility of the Translational Research Unit where she works on TB pathogenesis, TB immunodiagnostic tests and impact of Heminths infection on HIV and TB disease.

Keith Klugman

William H Foege Professor of Global Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA and Co-Director, Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Fellow of the African Academy of Microbiology; Fellow of the infectious Diseases Society of America; President of the International Society of Infectious Diseases; Recipient of John FW Herschel Medal of the Royal Society of South Africa.

Susanne Krauss-Etschmann

Main research Interests:
A) Asthma is a major cause of morbidity in the Western world but curative therapies do not exist. Hence, we aim to understand how early life environmental exposures modify lung development development and the risk of developing asthma throughout life. We use animal models of prenatal exposure to tobacco/nicotine products and human samples.
B) The importance of a steady-state balance of resident and non-resident bacterial communities for human health is increasingly appreciated. Yet, factors driving the composition of such microbial communities remain poorly understood. Therefore, we currently investigate the influence of smoke on the structure and functionality of the lung microbiome and its interaction with the lung health.
Currently Funded Projects
2012 – 2016 Chair of COST Action BM1201 “Developmental origins of Chronic Lung Disease” http://www.cost-early-origin-cld.eu/
2013 – 2016 Understanding the role of the lung microbiome for human health and diseases”, HMGU Environmental Health Projects, Co-PI until move to University of Kiel; Project currently continued on a collaborative basis.
Since 2013 – 2018 PI within German Center for Lung Research www.dzl.de
2016 - 2018 Chair of “The lung Microbiota at the Interface between airway epithelium and the environment” funded by the Leibniz Association

Yoshinori Marunaka

Professor and Chairperson, Departments of Molecular Cell Physiology and Bio-Ionomics, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Japan. President of The Physiological Society of Japan. Chief Editor, Journal of Physiological Sciences; Editor, Springer Plus; Editor of Frontiers in Physiology

Juan L Rodriguez-Flores

I am a Computational Biologist, Assistant Professor at Weill Medical College of Cornell University. I use -omic data to understand the mechanisms of disease risk.

I began my career as a Biology Undergraduate at MIT, where my first research project was to invent a method for attaching DNA to glass as part of the then-unfinished Human Genome Project. After MIT, I explored career options in Medical School Sillicon Valley and NIH, eventually earning a PhD in Bioinformatics and Systems Biology from UCSD. My doctoral dissertation involved characterizing the regulatory genetics of the adrenaline-synthesis gene PNMT, as well as more broadly studying the human adrenergic stress pathway. Seeking additional training in genomics and statistics, I spent a year working with Kelly Frazer at the Moores UCSD Cancer Center, followed by a move to Weill Cornell Medical College in 2010. As a postdoc, I developed a set of genomic analysis skills and tools that I applied to numerous projects, both locally and with international collaborators such as the 1000 Genomes Project, Weill Cornell Medical School in Qatar, and the University of Puerto Rico. In my current appointment as Assistant Professor, I am tasked with developing biotechnology tools for precision medicine.

Holger Schulz

The trained physician is Professor of Physiology at the Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich and has worked in the fields of respiratory physiology, intrapulmonary particle deposition, particulate matter associated health effects in the cardiopulmonary system. As head of the group “Lung epidemiology” he is now directing his work towards determinants of lung health and disease during growth and aging.