Advisory Board and Editors Computer Networks & Communications

PeerJ Factsheet
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Mario Luca Bernardi

I received the Laurea degree in Computer Science Engineering from the University of Naples Federico II, Italy, in 2003 and the Ph.D. degree in Information Engineering from the University of Sannio in 2007.

Since 2003 I have worked as a researcher in the field of software engineering writing more than 60 papers published in journals and conference proceedings. My main research interests include software maintenance and testing, software reuse, software reverse engineering, and re-engineering, with a particular interest in software modularization.
I also served both as a member of the program and organizing committees of several international conferences, and as a reviewer of papers submitted to some of the main journals and magazines in the field of data and process mining, software engineering, software maintenance, program comprehension, and the application of computational intelligence approaches in the above fields.
Currently, I am an Assistant Professor at Giustino Fortunato University, holding the courses of "Foundations of Computer Science" and "Software Systems and Services" for the Avionics Science and Technologies master degree.

Nirupama Bulusu

Nirupama Bulusu is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Portland State University. She received her Ph.D from the University of California at Los Angeles in 2002, and her B.Tech degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras in 1997, in Computer Science.Her research and teaching interests span networking, data analytics and information security and privacy. She is a recipient of the NSF CAREER award for her work in trustworthy participatory sensing.

Tracy Camp

Tracy Camp is a Professor of computer science at the Colorado School of Mines and an ACM Fellow. Dr. Camp has served as the Treasurer of SIGMOBILE and on several editorial boards (e.g., IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing) and technical programming committees (e.g., MobiCom and MobiHoc). She co-founded Networking Networking Women, and served as Co-chair of CRA-Women (an organization that won the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring in 2004).

Jinde Cao

Jinde Cao is an Endowed Chair Professor, the Dean of School of Mathematics and the Director of the Research Center for Complex Systems and Network Sciences at Southeast University. From March 1989 to May 2000, he was with the Yunnan University. In May 2000, he joined the School of Mathematics, Southeast University, Nanjing, China. From July 2001 to June 2002, he was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. Professor Cao was an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks, and Neurocomputing. He is an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Cybernetics, IEEE Transactions on Cognitive and Developmental Systems, Journal of the Franklin Institute, Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, Cognitive Neurodynamics, and Neural Networks. He is a Fellow of IEEE, a Member of the Academy of Europe, and a Foreign Fellow of Pakistan Academy of Sciences. He has been named as Highly-Cited Researcher in Engineering, Computer Science, and Mathematics by Thomson Reuters/Clarivate Analytics. He received the National Innovation Award of China (2017).

Vinton Cerf

Cerf is the co-designer of the TCP/IP protocols and the architecture of the Internet. He is the past President of ACM and is a member of the National Science Board.

Cerf has received the US Presidential Medal of Freedom, US National Medal of Technology, the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering, the Prince of Asturias Award, the Tunisian National Medal of Science, the Japan Prize, the Charles Stark Draper award, the ACM Turing Award, the Legion d’Honneur and 24 honorary degrees.

Marta Cimitile

Marta Cimitile received her degree with full marks and honors in Ingegneria Gestionale in 11/12/2003 from the Facoltà degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, presenting a thesis in “Enterprise management: organizational and technical problems related to implementation of a CRM”.

She has also received her PhD in software engineering at the Department of Informatics in the University of Bari, presenting a thesis in: “Knowledge Economy in Software Engineering”.

Currently she is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the Faculty of Economics of the Unitelma Sapienza in Rome (Italy). Her main research is in the study and evolution of Process Mining, Process and Knowledge Management and Knowledge transfer in Open Innovation.

She was involved in several industrial projects for the realization of an Experience Factory for the knowledge storing and reuse and she made several teaching and training activities in the context of these research projects . She is also partner of the SER&Practices spin off company of the University of Bari.

Peter Denning

Distinguished professor of computer science at Naval Postgraduate School. Past president of ACM. Past editor in chief of Communications of ACM. Currently editor of ACM Ubiquity. Author of ten books, most recent Great Principles of Computing (MIT Press 2015). Author of over four hundred scientific papers and articles.

Shlomi Dolev

Shlomi Dolev is an Israeli computer scientist best known for his contribution to self-stabilization. He is a professor at the Computer Science Department of the Ben-Gurion University, Israel. He has published numerous papers in the area of distributed computing. He is the author of a text book on self-stabilization.

Magda Elzarki

Magda El Zarki received the B.E.E. from Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt in 1979 and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Columbia University, New York City, NY. Magda El Zarki currently holds the position of Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of California, Irvine, where she is involved in various research activities related to telecommunication networks and networked computer games. She is the Director of the Institute for Virtual Environments.

Hari K Garg

Educator, researcher, innovator, and an entrepreneur. Research has evolved from the lowest layers of 7-layer OSI model to the highest! Enjoys watching NFL and singing Bollywood songs! Has worked for Syracuse University, Philips/Lucent, and National University of Singapore. Infocomm technologies and their connections to humans fascinates Hari. His start-up companies are based on his own research and intellectual capital. The record of success is mixed. The journey continues forever.

Nancy Griffeth

I taught at Lehman College and the CUNY Graduate Center for 12 years, from 2003 to 2015. I am now retired.

My research specialty when I arrived was Computer Networks and I taught Computer Networks as often as I could. Subsequently, I collaborated with Prof. Stephen Redenti, a biologist at Lehman, on a computational biology project to simulate migrating cells. We introduced computational biology courses and a new minor in Quantitative and Systems Biology at Lehman.

Susan C. Herring

Professor of Information Science and Adjunct Professor of Linguistics at Indiana University Bloomington. Director, Center for Computer-Mediated Communication, Indiana University Bloomington. Editor, Language@Internet. Past editor, Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication.

Dr. Herring’s first intellectual passion was foreign languages. After being employed as a Graduate Student Instructor in the French Dept. and then the Linguistics Dept. at U.C. Berkeley in the 1980s, she was appointed as an Instructor in the Special Languages Program at Stanford University to teach Tamil in 1989. She was subsequently hired as an Assistant Professor in the English Department at Cal State University, San Bernardino, to teach discourse analysis, in 1989, and promoted to Associate Professor in 1992. In the same year, she moved to the University of Texas, Arlington, where she was an Associate Professor in Linguistics until 2000. During that time the Internet was expanding rapidly, and her research interests shifted from traditional linguistics towards computer-mediated communication. In 2000, she joined the School of Library and Information Science at Indiana University, and was promoted to Professor in 2002. She also holds an Adjunct Professor appointment in the Linguistics Dept. at Indiana University and is a Fellow in the Center for Research on Learning Technologies and a Fellow in the Center for Social Informatics.