Huizhan Liu

Huizhan Liu


Summary

My name is Huizhan Liu, and I graduated from medical school in 2008. And then I worked in the Institute of Otolaryngology, Chinese PLA General Hospital. In 2012, I joined into Dr David’s lab, in Biomedical Science Department of Creighton University, Omaha, NE. My research efforts have been focused on the genetics, pathology and molecular biological mechanisms of several major groups of sensorineural hearing loss. My current experiments are about studying the mechanisms of the inner ear’s outer hair cell (OHC), which is a kind of receptor cells and plays a critical role in mammalian hearing. OHCs enhance basilar membrane motion through a local mechanical feedback process within the cochlea, termed the ‘cochlear amplifier’. The research in my laboratory focuses on the forward and reverse transduction in OHCs. Recordings are made from isolated hair cells, cultured organ of Corti preparations, and hemicochlea, in conjunction with molecular, morphological and other novel techniques to investigate properties of these cells and their roles in cochlear functions in mammals. The laboratory is fully equipped to conduct experiments at the cellular level with novel techniques. It includes three setups for doing standard whole-cell patch-clamp experiments. All three setups are also equipped with opto-electronic systems that allow measuring cell/hair-bundle motion down to nanometer range.

Cell Biology Genetics Genomics Molecular Biology Neuroscience Pathology Taxonomy

Institution affiliations

Work details

research associate

Creighton University
February 2012
Biomedical Science
My current experiments are about studying the mechanisms of the inner ear’s outer hair cell (OHC), which is a kind of receptor cells and plays a critical role in mammalian hearing. OHCs enhance basilar membrane motion through a local mechanical feedback process within the cochlea, termed the ‘cochlear amplifier’. It is generally believed that the basis of cochlear amplification is a voltage-dependent somatic length change of OHCs. In this scheme, receptor potentials produced by transducer current in response to acoustic stimulation provide the input to the cell’s motor activity. Consequently, the OHC is thought to perform two transducer functions, a conventional mechanoelectrical or forward transduction in the stereocilia, and a specialized electromechanical or reverse transduction in the basolateral membrane . The research in my laboratory focuses on the forward and reverse transduction in OHCs. Recordings are made from isolated hair cells, cultured organ of Corti preparations, and hemicochlea, in conjunction with molecular, morphological and other novel techniques to investigate properties of these cells and their roles in cochlear functions in mammals. The laboratory is fully equipped to conduct experiments at the cellular level with novel techniques. It includes three setups for doing standard whole-cell patch-clamp experiments. All three setups are also equipped with opto-electronic systems that allow measuring cell/hair-bundle motion down to nanometer range.